Page 64 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 10 (1951-1952)

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
58
Editorial Advisory Board of
In Jewish Bookland
, Budget, Judges
for Poetry Awards, Judges for Fiction Award, and Library
Citations.
At the request of the Jewish Center Division of the National
Jewish Welfare Board, the Council made a self-evaluation of its
activities. By and large it expressed satisfaction with its program,
although reservations were expressed concerning both
In Jewish
Bookland
and the
Jewish Book Annual.
Both of these publications
are still under consideration as to their future character.
ANNUAL MEETING
Dr. Abraham J. Heschel, author of
Man is Not Alone
and
The Earth is the Lord'si
was the main speaker at the Annual
Meeting of the National Committee of the Council which was
held on May 16, 1951, at the Jewish Museum in New York City.
He delivered a stimulating address on “Architecture of Time.”
Dr. Joshua Bloch of the New York Public Library was presented
with a testimonial of appreciation in recognition of his unique
contribution to Jewish literature and of his generous support to
the ideals and goals of our Council. The testimonial read in part:
“Dr. Joshua Bloch — rabbi, librarian, bibliographer, editor and
author — has served the Jewish Book Council of America since
its inception, as a faithful member of the Executive Board, a
learned contributor to the Jewish Book Annual, and a cooperative
participant in the Council’s numerous activities. As chief of the
Jewish Division of the New York Public Library, he has made
available his rich resources of Jewish literature and information
to many scholars, authors, students, and laymen.”
Dr. Mortimer J. Cohen, in his presidential address, said in part:
“With the increasing mechanization of our lives, we become
more and more passive observers of the passing scene. In the
world of sports, in the arts, and even in politics, we have become
accustomed to pay the admission price but to let others act and
do the work. That is why undoubtedly there has been a gradual
loss of interest in the Book, because the Book requires an active
participation and an active struggle with the spirit of the author
to understand his thought, to master it, if need be, to overcome it.
Reading is a serious discipline of the spirit that exacts affirmations
and cooperation of both reader and author. This is why the Book
is the true symbol of vital civilization. This is why the Jewish
Book and the Jewish people have become inextricably intertwined
in each other’s destiny.”