Page 36 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 11 (1952-1952)

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JEWI SH BOOK ANNUAL
3 0
children. In telling their story, the author also tells the story of 50,000 home-
less, forlorn children, restored to healthy normal living. Expressive, expert
photography, and a continuous dramatic commentary. A beautiful, authentic
book, which will furnish joy and information to the reader, (ages 9-12)
H
o row it z
, C
a ro l in e
(Joanna Strong, pseud.) and
L
e o n a rd
, T
om
B. A treasury of
the world’s great heroines. Illustrated by Hubert Whatley. New York,
Hart, 1951. 190 p.
Contains brief biographic sketches of 18 American and 12 heroines of other
lands. This is a companion volume to
A Treasury of Hero Stories
, published
previously. All the personalities chosen have a human and historic appeal
and should prove inspiring reading for early teen-age boys and girls. Jewish
personalities included are Emma Lazarus, Lillian Wald, Queen Esther, and
Hannah Senesh. (ages 9-14)
H
u t ch iso n
, R
uth
and
A
dams
, R
u t h
.
Every day’s a holiday. New York, Harper,
1951. 304 p.
Every day is a holiday for some people in some part o f the world.
365
holidays, each o f which falls on another day are described. The Jewish
holidays, w ith the exception o f Lag ba-Omer, are included, (ages
10-13)
J
ones
, J
essie
O
rton
. Th is is the way. Illustrated by E lizabeth Orton Jones.
New York, Viking,
1951, 62
p.
A
picture story book which should help in bringing to children a sense of
mutual respect and understanding. The prayers and precepts used have been
selected from sacred writings of various peoples to indicate how God is wor-
shipped and to underline the sense of brotherly love which dominates all
prayer. Hebrew excerpts are included, (ages 6-10)
,
K
olatch
, A
l fr ed
J. Our religion: The Torah. New York, Jonathan David Co.,
1951. 70 p.
The first of a projected series of text books dealing with the Jewish religion
intended for young readers. The book is simply and clearly written giving
explanations and illustrations in black-and-white on the Scroll and the Law.
The text also includes a 42-page activity book, (ages 8-12)
K
ra k ow er
, I
s id or
E. Haggadah for young American Jews. Philadelphia,
Malerman, 1951. 107 p.
A modern
Haggadah
which correlates the traditional Passover idea of
freedom with American Jewish life, overseas needs and the State of Israel.
K
r i p k e
, D
oro thy
K .
Rhymes to pray. Illustrated by Jessie B. Robinson.
New York, Bloch, 1952.
This is a charming group of quatrains based on specific Hebrew prayers,
containing traditional Jewish values. It is an attempt to introduce the modern
child to a sense and an understanding of prayer in words of practically one
syllable.
L
ion
, T
he
P
rinter
, ed. Calendar for Israel’s Children. Tel Av iv , Lion, The
Printer; American distributor: Estran Trading, N ew York,
1951.
An annual edition of a children’s calendar. Gorgeous colors and attractive
designs. Beautiful photographs present Israel in an exciting and happy mood
for the Jewish child. Much useful information describes the illustrations,
(ages 8-14)
M
a l v er n
, G
ladys
.
Behold your queen! New York, Longmans, 1951. 218
p .
The story of Esther in fiction form, intended for teen-age girls. A sympa-
thetic, romantic rendering of the historic Megillah heroine, (ages 13-16)
P
e s s in
, D
e b o r a h
.
The Jewish people: Book 1. Illustrated by Ruth Levin.
New York, United Synagogue Commission on Jewish Education, 1951. 239 p.
The first in a three-volume history of the Jewish people, planned for a three
year study course. This volume begins with the days of Abraham and con-
tinues through the Judean exiles’ return from Babylonia. Study aids and
class projects are included at the end of each chapter. A book of high peda-
gogic merit, (ages 10-13)
S
c h a r f s t e in
, E
dythe
and
S
ol
.
Rhyme-Land for Jewish children. New York,
Ktav, 1951. 44 p.
A collection of short verses for Jewish children, profusely illustrated, con-
taining information on the Jewish festivals in very simple language, (ages 6-9)