Page 177 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 12

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JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL OF AMERICA
1952-1954
By
P
h il ip
G
oodm an
n pH IS summary report of the activities during the past two
-״־ years of the Jewish Book Council of America, sponsored by
the National Jewish Welfare Board, is intended to serve not only
as a record of accomplishments but more important as an indica-
tion of the awakening interest of American Jewry in Jewish lit-
erature. The expanding program of the Council was necessitated
by an increasing concern with Jewish books. While it is undoubt-
edly true that there are as yet untold numbers who have made no
impact on the Council and upon whom in turn the Council has
made no impression, it is a fact that an increasing desire for Jewish
knowledge has caused the Council to intensify its program. On
the eve of the celebration of the tercentenary of Jewish settlement
in the United States, this evidence augurs well for the future of
the American Jewish community.
JEWISH BOOK MONTH
By and large, the observance of Jewish Book Month from No-
vember 7 to December 7, 1952, and from October 30 to November
30, 1953, followed the pattern developed in previous years. The
national organizations affiliated with the Jewish Book Council of
America were actively engaged in promoting this project. Local
Bureaus of Jewish Education, Jewish Community Centers, public
and college libraries, and many other agencies participated through
a variety of stimulating programs. The Jewish book was honored
at colorful and edifying programs arranged by scores of Jewish
Community Centers affiliated with the National Jewish Welfare
Board. Outstanding exhibits of old books and manuscripts and
Jewish books in English, Hebrew, and Yiddish were featured at
many Jewish Book Month observances. Thousands of people
heard Jewish authors at lectures and “Meet the Author” programs
where audiences sought enlightenment concerning such topics as
Great Jewish Books, Development of Jewish Literature, Women
in Jewish Literature, and similar literary subjects. Visiting Israeli
authors and scholars participated in programs. Synagogues staged
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