Page 97 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 12

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AMERICAN JEWISH NON-FICTION BOOKS
1952-1954
By I.
E
dw a r d
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ON-FICTION books within the last two years have not
decreased in number and include scholarly and popular
studies of Jewish history, sociology and cultural life.
Books on American Jewish history deserve special notice in
connection with the current celebration of the tercentenary of
Jewish settlement in the United States. One can point to an
authoritative study of phases of Jewish life in the colonial period
and to a history of the Jewish labor movement which began in the
nineteenth century. The popular pictorial history will attract the
lay reader for its succinct review of Jewish events. Some recent
biographies of American Jews will be of interest to the general
public which wants to become acquainted with famous Jews who
made important contributions to general welfare in America.
Younger Jewish scholars have elucidated Biblical history and
have contributed to understanding the religious life of the second
Commonwealth and the Sanhedrin. They have also prepared new
translations of books of the Bible and the Apocrypha.
Annuals published by the Hebrew Union College, the YIVO,
and the American Academy of Jewish Research contain the fruit
of research and study in every area of
Jiidische Wissenschaft.
The Jewish Theological Seminary added a significant volume to the
list of
Festschriften
honoring its teachers.
The literature of Jewish music has been enriched by the com-
pletion of the
Cantorial Anthology
and new editions of the great
works of Jewish synagogue music published during the year.
The discovery of new Aramaic papyri from Elephantine, now
in the Brooklyn Museum, has been followed by a sumptuous edi-
tion of the text. The origins of art and symbols of the ancient
synagogues were traced in a new light in three illustrated volumes
of the Bollingen series.
Books on the great catastrophe in European Jewish life,
Khurban
literature, were compiled by competent scholars who had personal
access to original documents and to the events themselves. Thus
stories of the Warsaw Ghetto and of the liberated Jews in Germany
are now available in English for the first time.
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