Page 150 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 13

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JEWI SH BOOK ANNUAL
142
M
a s e f i e l d
, M
u r i e l
.
Peacocks and primroses: a survey of Disraeli’s novels.
London, Geoffrey Bles, 1953. 319 p.
Jewish readers will be interested in the account of “Alroy,” a Prince of the
Captivity, a tale of a medieval Jewish hero, who sought to revive his people’s
national glory, and in “Tancred,” the tale of an English nobleman who goes
to the Holy Land to search among the Holy Places for the guidance of
God.
M
a y h ew
, C
h r is t o p h e r
P. Men seeking God. London, Allen and Unwin, 1955.
H8 p.
A series of television programs in which the author records interviews with
a Moslem, Hindu, Buddhist, Jew, Protestant and a Catholic. The Jewish
case is luminously put by the Rev. I. Levy, O.B.E., Senior Chaplain of the
Forces and Minister of the Hampstead Synagogue.
M
e l k m a n
,
J. David Franco Mendes: a Hebrew poet. Jerusalem, Massada;
Amsterdam, Joachims Thai, 1953. 153 p.
The life of a prolific and versatile 18th century Hebrew poet — a rich
Amsterdam merchant and lay member of the Sefardi Bet Din, who adapted
Racine’s
Athalie
, wrote verse in Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese and French,
and contributed to the first Hebrew periodical,
Ha-meassej.
M
e n d il o w
, A
dam
A
b r a h a m
.
Time and the novel. London, Peter Nevill, 1953.
245 p.
On the novelists’ treatment of time. A historical survey of the pioneers of
the novel in 17th century France and Spain and in 18th century England,
down to the moderns. A doctorate thesis by the Professor of English at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Mishnayoth: vol. 2: Moed: Hebrew text, translation, introduction and notes.
Edited by Philip Blackman. London, Mishna Press, 1952. 575 p.
A vocalized Hebrew text and a literal and accurate translation with simple
explanatory notes of the 12 treatises of
Moed
, dealing with the sacred days in
the Jewish calendar. Suitable for school, class or private study.
Mishnayoth: vol. 3: Nashim: Hebrew text, translation, introduction and notes.
Edited by Philip Blackman. London, Mishna Press, 1953. 517 p.
Deals with the bases of Jewish family law.
Mishnayoth: vol. 4: Nezikin: Hebrew text, translation, introduction and notes.
Edited by Philip Blackman. London, Mishna Press, 1954. 616 p.
On Jewish civil and criminal law and the law of procedure, with much light
on contemporary history.
Mishnayoth: vol. 5: Kodashim: Hebrew text, translation, introduction and notes.
Edited by Philip Blackman. London, Mishna Press, 1954. 612 p.
Upon the ritual and the sacrifices in the Temple.
M
o n t a g u
, E
w e n
.
The man who never was. Liverpool, Evans Bros., 1953. 160 p.
The story of an intelligence incident during the height of World War II,
by a leader of Anglo-Jewish life.
M
o r r i s
, Y
a a k o v
.
Pioneers from the west. Jerusalem, World Zionist Organization,
1953. 160 p.
A history of colonization in Israel by settlers from English-speaking
countries.
M
u n e l e s
, O
t t o
.
Bibliographical survey of Jewish Prague. Prague, Jewish State
Museum, 1952. 563 p.
A comprehensive bibliography from 1512 to 1951. Well illustrated.
N
e u f e l d
, E .
The Hittite laws. London, Luzac, 1951. 209 p. 50 plates.
An English translation of the Hittite laws opposite a Hebrew translation.
A comparative study of ancient codes in relation to the Hittite code and a
short account of the Hittite discoveries and the Hittite language, with photo-
graphic illustrations of the original clay tablets.
O
w e n
, A
r o n
.
Rashi. London, Jewish Religious Educational Publications, 1955.
32 p.
Pirke Aboth: sayings of the Fathers. Introduction and commentary by J. H.
Hertz. London, East and West, 1952. 95 p.
A homiletical commentary for everyman upon the rabbinic guide to Jewish
conduct.