Page 99 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 13

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GOLDSTEIN — JEWISH JUVENILE BOOKS
A fast-paced retelling of the biblical story of David, which ought to appeal
to younger teen-agers of any religious background. The account is human and
believable, yet does not stray from the scriptural source, (ages 12-16)
K l a p e r m a n , L i b b y
M. Stories of the Bible. Illustrated by N. Dufourt. New
York, Sann’s Publishing Co., 1954. 176 p.
Stories of the Bible for the young reader. The general make-up of the book
is exciting and invites reading. The story follows the context of the Bible
and is thickly interspersed with quotations. Each page is labeled as to chapter
and verse with the source of its counterpart in the Bible, (ages 10-14)
K u b i e , N o r a
B. King Solomon’s navy. Illustrated by the author. New York,
Harper, 1954. 181 p.
A shepherd lad of ancient Judea, sold into slavery, serves as cabin boy on a
naval expedition down the African coast, meeting dangers of many kinds.
Distinctive in writing, entertaining in plot, and convincing in characterization,
this historical sea adventure is enhanced by details of life in ancient Judea
and unobtrusive explanations of Hebrew beliefs, based on intelligent research.
The young hero emerges from all of his trying adventures spiritually sound
and enriched in his Hebraic background and heritage. Winner of the Jewish
Book Council of America’s Isaac Siegel Memorial Juvenile Award, (ages 12—15)
L e v i n g e r , E lm a E h r l i c h .
Jewish adventures in America. Designed by William
Steinel. New York, Bloch, 1954. 243 p.
A survey o f 300 years of Jewish participation in American life, the book
is divided into three parts: “We come to America,” “We grow with America,”
and “We pay our debt to America.” The story is dramatically presented,
largely through biographies of the men and women who made Jewish-American
history. An eminently readable, attractive volume, published on the occasion
of the Tercentenary, (ages 10-14)
L o n g , L a u r a .
Joseph: slave and prince. New York, Association Press, 1955. 126 p.
The ninth volume in the “Heroes of God” series published by the Association
Press is the fourth devoted to Jewish personalities. It relates the basic material
on Joseph, plus some legends that are found in scholarly volumes, (ages 12-15)
Noah’s ark: adapted from the Book of Genesis for young children. Illustrated
by Jo Spier. Magic Talking Books T 4. Philadelphia, Winston, 1955. n. p.
A brief retelling. The record on the cover, “All Aboard the Ark,” is an
adaptation of “One More River to Cross. ” (ages 5-8)
O r l e a n s , I l o .
The first rainbow: a book of rhymes from Bible times. Illustrated
by Maurice Rawson. New York, Union of American Hebrew Congregations,
1954. 60 p.
This is a first and highly successful attempt to express in verse for children
both the content and the moral and spiritual values of the Book of Books,
(ages 10-14)
S a m u e l s , R u t h .
Bible stories for Jewish children: from creation to Joshua.
Illustrated by Laszlo Matulay. New York, Ktav, 1954. 72 p.
S m i t h e r , E t h e l
L. Early Old Testament stories. Illustrated by Kurt Wiese.
Nashville, Abingdon Press, 1954. 80 p.
A story of Abraham’s journey to find the land God promised him, of Isaac
and Jacob and Joseph, and Moses who also believed in God’s promise. Simply
told, the stories retain the Biblical feeling, (ages 6-9)
T a y l o r , S y d n e y .
More all-of-a-kind family. Illustrated by Mary Stevens.
Chicago, Follet, 1954. 127 p.
All-of-a-kind fam ily
, which won the Charles W. Follet Award of $3,000
and a gold medal, plus the Isaac Siegel Memorial Award as the best Jewish
juvenile of the year, now has a sequel. The five girls and a small boy are back
in a series of everyday experiences filled with the same fun and happy feeling
that distinguished the first book about them. Altogether a delightful glimpse
of life with an orthodox Jewish family in New York’s lower East Side of 1916.
(ages 9-14)
W a g o n e r , J e a n B r o w n .
The captive lad: a story of Daniel the lion-hearted.
Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, 1954. 181 p.
A fictional treatment of the Biblical Daniel devoting major space to his
childhood and early youth and a final chapter to his old age and the lion’s