Page 191 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 15

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GOODMAN— JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL
181
for his work
Raquel: The Jewess of Toledo.
The judges were:
Charles Angoff, New York; Dr. Mortimer J. Cohen, Philadelphia;
Leo W. Schwarz, New York.
HARRY KOVNER MEMORIAL POETRY AWARDS
The Harry Kovner Memorial Poetry Awards, each valued at
$100 plus a citation, were presented to authors of published
volumes of Jewish poetry in Hebrew and in Yiddish. The recip­
ients were: Moshe Feinstein for his work
Avraham Abulafia\
and
Jacob Glatstein for his work
Fun Mein Gantzer Mie.
The judges
were: Dr. Milton Arfa, New York; Ephraim Auerbach, New
York; Hayyim Bass, New York; Rabbi Jacob Kabakoff, Cleve­
land; Prof. Shalom Spiegel, New York; Moshe Starkman, New
York.
ANNUAL MEETING
The Annual Meeting of the Council was held on May 8, 1957,
in the auditorium of the Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute
of Religion, New York City, with Rabbi Ely E. Pilchik, president,
in the chair. The meeting was opened with greetings by Solomon
Kerstein, chairman of the Program Committee.
The annual literary awards were presented by Joseph A. Daroff,
Bernard Kovner, Milton Kovner and Martin Rodman. Dr. I.
Edward Kiev presented the library citations.
A memorial tribute was paid to the late Dr. Jacob Shatzky who
had served faithfully for many years as a member of the executive
board, as associate editor of the
Jewish Book Annual
and associate
editor of
In Jewish Bookland
, as well as judge for our annual
literary awards.
The meeting featured a panel discussion on “The Jewish Book
in America.” The following viewpoints'were represented: author —
Leo W. Schwarz; editor — Solomon Grayzel; organization —
Mrs. Charles Schwartz; publisher — Thomas Yoseloff.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Jewish Book Council of America is grateful to the hundreds
of national and local organizations which have made possible the
implementation of its objectives. Untold numbers of individuals
in urban and rural areas have shared in the Council’s diverse
activities. As the Council with its limited resources can serve only
as a stimulus, it requires the participation of the volunteers whose
cooperation it has gratefully succeeded in enlisting.