Page 65 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 15

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ALPERT ---- LIBRARIES IN ISRAEL
57
Jerusalem is fortunate in possessing several other fine libraries.
The Schocken Library, established by Salman Schocken in 1934,
comprises over 55,000 volumes, mainly Judaica and many priceless
incunabula, first editions, art books and other collectors’ items.
The founder and patron thoughtfully provided a suitable building
for the collection.
The largest collection of art literature in the Middle East is to
be found in the library attached to the Bezalel Museum, totalling
some 25,000 items. One of the features is a splendid collection of
200 rare Passover
Haggadot
, and a growing accumulation of the
contemporary
Haggadot
produced by kibbutzim.
An excellent collection on Judaism is to be found in the Rav
Kook Institute.
The capital city contains also the Bnai Brith Public Library
(24.000), and the small but growing library of the Knesseth
(12.000). Several of the government ministries, notably Foreign
Affairs, Justice and Defense, have built working libraries for their
purposes. The Ministry of Education has set up an Institute of
Hebrew Manuscripts which has been collecting microfilms of
Hebrew manuscripts located in libraries throughout the world.
The Israeli State Archives, formerly housed at Hakirya, have
recently been moved up to the seat of government in Jerusalem.
Here are to be found all state documents, historic files and miscel­
laneous treasures.
The Haifa Central Synagogue houses a Scientific Biblical and
Judaica Library of over 6,000 volumes. They are mainly on
Biblical, Talmudic, Hassidic and Kabbalistic subjects.
In Tel Aviv the 9,000 books of the Association of Architects and
Engineers are frequently consulted by members who can not
easily make the trip to the Technion library in Haifa. The Manu­
facturers’ Association in Tel Av iv also maintains a library for its
special needs.
There are 22 medical libraries in Israel, principally the Dr.
Julius Jarcho library in Jerusalem, and the Dr. Harry Frieden-
wald Collection on the History of Medicine.
Also in Jerusalem is the Y.M.C.A. Library of 25,000 volumes.
The Agricultural Research Station at Rehovoth has 40,000
books, pamphlets and reprints.
C
onc lu s ion
The difficulties facing Israel’s libraries are many, but these may
be summed briefly, including mention of some which obviously
deserve further treatment than they have received here.