Page 195 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 16

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J E W I S H B O O K S IN E N G L I S H
P
u b l is h e d
O
u t s id e
T
h e
USA
1957-1958
B
y
R
u t h
P . L
e h m a n n
T
HE Jewish Book Council of England, in sponsoring the
Jewish Book Week of 1958, served again to acquaint the
Anglo-Jewish community with the results of its past and present
literary endeavors. In addition to a Book Exhibition which in-
eluded many of the items here listed, public lectures by well-
known scholars acted as a cultural stimulus to the community,
which responded in greater numbers than ever before. To sup-
plement the metropolitan activities, Book Week functions were
also organized, as before, in other centers of Jewish life in the
British Isles.
An event of special interest to many Anglo-Jewish book lovers
took place at the end of 1957. Great Britain’s largest Jewish
library, located at Jews’ College, moved to its newly constructed
home in commodious surroundings worthy of its great collections
of Judaica and Hebraica.
The bibliography compiled for this survey points up the wide
range of subjects of Jewish interest, even though the writers
are not always Jews. This applies particularly to the few listed
books written during or after the Middle East crisis in 1956 by
authors who were often politicians or political observers (as,
for example, M. Bromberger and A. Nutting). Non-Jewish
writers also continue to produce the majority of works on Bible
studies and Biblical history (notable among these is
The History
of Israel
by M. Noth). Since few books have been written by
Jewish authors on these and similar subjects, the contributions of
the non-Jewish writers have been included in this bibliography.
Jewish writers continue, however, to enrich the fields of spe-
cifically traditional Jewish scholarship in its many ramifications,
and their contributions, it will be noticed, constitute a major
proportion of this bibliography.
The Jewish Chronicle,
the weekly journal of Anglo-Jewry,
has in the period under review begun the publication of a series
of
Guides
to the festivals. Those relating to Yom Kippur and
Pesah have already appeared and have been accorded an appre-
ciative welcome. The World Jewish Congress, British Section,
181