Page 78 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 17 (1958-1959)

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72
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SUMMARY
T
N HIS A RT IC LE on S. S. Frug (on the occasion of the one
1 hundredth anniversary of his birth), poet Leon Feinberg
examines the tragic career of the pioneer of Yiddish poetry as
well as his personal misfortune which resulted from his mar­
riage to the daughter of a Russian Pope. Frug was an important
poet of the Russian language. He made use of many Jewish and
Biblical motifs in his Russian poetry, and occupied a notable
place in Russian literary circles. His poetic tragedy lay in his
desire to write in Russian, although he knew that Russian poetry
on Jewish motifs fell upon deaf ears in anti-Semitic Tzarist
Russia. His poems in Yiddish appealed to the broad Jewish
masses, but he himself was not enthused about the language,
which in those days was poor in literary expression.