Page 156 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 18

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AMERICAN JEWISH NON-FICTION BOOKS
1 959 - 1960
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y
I.
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dward
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iev
T
HE aim of this bibliographical record is to present the sum
of scholarly and literary publications in Jewish history,
Bible studies, biographies and memoirs, anthologies and works
of poetry and drama. The list of books on Israel and Zionism
hitherto listed separately in the
Annual
is now included in
this bibliography. While most of the books are by Jewish authors,
there are many by non-Jews, especially the books in Biblical re-
search and the study of the Dead Sea or Qumran Scrolls.
The reader will find a special interest in the availability in
English translation of two noteworthy Hebrew works in Jewish
history by two Israeli scholars: the volume on Hellenism by
the late Professor Tcherikover, and the work on the religion
of Israel by Professor Yehezkel Kaufmann of the Hebrew Uni-
versity. The volume on the Jews in the Renaissance fills a spe-
cial need for students interested in that significant period of
European history. The shelf dealing with American Jewish his-
tory has expanded to include three fine works on the Jewish
communities of St. Paul, Minnesota, Utica, New York, and
Toronto, Canada. New documents relating to the history of the
Jews in colonial Brazil have been uncovered and published by
a competent authority.
The variety and color of eminent Jewish personalities as well
as of American Jews living in every part of the land are brought
to light in the score or more of biographies and memoirs. The
reminiscences of the eminent jurist of the United States Supreme
Court who relates also his role in Zionist affairs leads the books
about familiar personalities, beginning with Frankfurter and
Flexner to the Lubavitcher Rabbi and the Szold family of
Baltimore. The names of Disraeli and Buber occur with a Plotkin
in California and a Meyer in Oklahoma and Barnett Brickner in
Cleveland. Prizefighters and comedians, statesmen and editors,
intimates of Herzl and Weizmann, have added new light in
the recollections of their experiences.
Jewish philosophy and thought, existentialist and Hasidic
influences in Judaism, anthologies on the Jewish woman and
modern Jewish thought, have come from the hands of com-
petent scholars. The volumes on Jewish art and artists and on
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