Page 221 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 18

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A N G L O - J EW I S H BOOKS
1959 - 1960
B
y
R
u t h
P.
L
e h m a n n
T
HE year 1959-1960 witnessed the continuation of the tradi-
tional interest evinced by the Anglo-Jewish reading public
in the Jewish Book. The appended bibliography is clear evidence
that Anglo-Jewry has been enriched again by many publications
on a diversity of subjects written both by its own sons and by
writers of other faiths whose works serve as contributions to
Jewish scholarship in this country. Some of the items, as the
annotations indicate, are designedly scholarly; others, of a less
learned nature, are intended primarily for the layman.
The popular and warmly welcomed series of
Guides
to the
Jewish festivals, published by
The Jewish Chronicle,
has now
been completed, all contributors having been Anglo-Jewish
rabbis or ministers. Two further series of books have now com-
menced publication, one for younger readers, entitled
Famous
Jews,
and the other on
Makers of Modern Jewish History,
which
is being issued by the Hillel Foundation. Books in both these
series are already in circulation and will be found itemized below.
It is noteworthy that for the second year in succession, a book
on a specifically Jewish topic has been produced under the im-
print of the
Penguin Books.
The climax of metropolitan Jewry’s cultural life may be said
to occur annually when the Jewish Book Council arranges its
Jewish Book Week, consisting of lectures, exhibitions and
other cultural events. This year the Week was inaugurated by
Master of the Supreme Court, Dr. A. S. Diamond, with an
address on “The Earliest Hebrew Scribes.” It was followed on
subsequent evenings by lectures in Hebrew by Professor A.
Kachalsky and Yishar Smilansky and in English by the Rev. Dr.
C. Pearl, on current events in the cultural sphere in Israel, Eng-
land and America. Two features, however, differentiated this
Book Week from all its predecessors. For the first time, two
afternoon functions, both held under the auspices of Zionist
women’s societies, were organized; they consisted of lectures
delivered by Rabbi Dr. E. Wiesenberg and Professor N. Bentwich,
both of whom incidentally feature in our list. In addition, the
concluding evening, aptly termed “Neilah and Kumsitz,” was
arranged by Jewish students and graduates of London University.
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