Page 56 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 18

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J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
4 8
1948) is another important Canadian novel from the pen of a
Jew.
Norman Levine’s novel,
The Angled Road
(Toronto, 1953),
is laid in Ottawa. His poetry
Myssium
(Toronto, 1948) and the
Tight Rope Walker
(London, 1950) are highly regarded by
Canadian critics, but his
Canada Made Me
, a travel book of his
homeland (London, 1958), aroused resentment. Abraham Mar-
golian’s
A Piece of Blue Heaven
deals with Jewish life in
Amsterdam (Fredericton, 1956). Dr. A. Stilman’s novel,
Healer
of Al l Flesh
(Toronto, 1959), has medicine as its theme.
The most significant of Canadian Jewish novelists to-day is
undoubtedly Mordecai Richler whose experimental first novel,
The Acrobats
(New York, London, 1954), was laid in Spain.
His second,
Son of a Smaller Hero
, is autobiographical and
deals with Montreal (London, 1955).
A Choice of Enemies
(London, 1957) has its setting in London, while his most recent
The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz
(London, 1959) returns
again to a sharp criticism of the Montreal Jewish scene.
Another Canadian writer who won the Governor General’s
Award is Adele Wiseman, whose
The Sacrifice
(New York,
Toronto, London, 1956) deals with the life of immigrant Jews
in Winnipeg.
The works of Lawrence Montague Lande, mostly in poetry
or in poetic prose, are distinguished for the rare beauty of the
editions. Collectors will certainly vie for his
Old Lamps Aglow
(1957),
Credo
(1950),
Sackcloth and Light
(1948),
Towards
the Quiet Mind
(1952),
The Ladder
(1958),
The Third Duke of
Richmond
(1956), and
Response to Precious Moments
(1959).
Of the most recently published Canadian Jewish poets we
might mention Leonard N. Cohen’s
Let Us Compare Mythologies
(Toronto, 1956); Henry Moscovitch’s
The Serpent Ink
(To-
ronto, 1956); Harold Silverman’s
Twenty-Two Improvisations
(Toronto, 1940); Eli Mandel’s
Trio
(Montreal, 1954); Nathan
Goldberg’s
Twelve Poems
by Nathan Ralph (pseud.) (Toronto,
1941) and
Coffee and Bitters
(Toronto, 1947).
Yiddish Li terature in Canada
Even more impressive is Yiddish literature in Canada. The
first Yiddish book printed in Canada appeared in Montreal in
1910: M. E. Levin’s
Kinder Ertziung bei Yidn.
It was followed
by Ezekiel M. Bronstein’s
Blitzen fun dis Kleine Menshele
in
Winnipeg (1917), and by
Tzvei Velten
(1919) and
Milchomeh
Veyen.
Also in 1917, Pesach Matenko published his
Lieder
in Toronto,
and in 1918 M. Samuelson of Montreal had his
Veltn un
Tzeitn
published in New York. H. Hirsch published his
Fablen