Page 57 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 18

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49
R
om e
— J
ew ish
C
a n a d ia n a
in Montreal in 1918 and his
Hundert Tropns Tin t
in Toronto.
The following year, L. Rosenberg edited
Canada, A Zamlbuch
in Toronto.
But Montreal soon assumed the leadership in Yiddish letters,
developing such figures as Jacob Isaac Segal and Noah J.
Gotlib. Segal, like the others, was a native of Europe, and his
poetry reflects his cultural roots overseas. Any library of Jewish
Canada must certainly place beside the central works of Klein,
Rosenberg, Sack and Hart the poetic collections of Segal:
Basun-
der
(1921),
Di Dritte Seudeh
(1937),
Dos Hoiz fun di Poshute
(1940),
Lieder
(1926),
Lieder un Loiben
(1944),
Lyric
(1930),
Letzte Lieder
(1955),
Mein Nigun
(1934),
Sefer Yiddish
(1950),
Fun Mein Veit,
and, if this rare book can be secured,
Mein
Shtub un Mein Veit
(Vienna, 1923).
The same period saw the publication of Gotlib’s poetry:
Iberboi
(1940),
Drei Poemes
(1955),
Zeglen in Zun
(1932),
Chalutzim
(1943),
Li t te Mein Heimland
(1945),
Mein Land,
Mein Liedershe
(1958),
A Mensch in die Himlen
(1950),
Neie
Lieder
(1943), and his prose
Sovietische Shreiber
(1945). There
appeared also Jacob Zipper’s autobiographical
Oif Yener Zeit
Bug
(1946) and the Baal Shem Tov story
Geven iz a Mensch
(1940) [also in the Hebrew versions
Ish Hay ah ba’Aretz
(Tel
Aviv) and
Me’Ever Linhar Bug
(Tel Aviv, 1957)]. Judica
published her
Shpliters
(1943),
Vandervegn
(1934), and
Tzar
un Freid
(1949); Ida Massey her
Lieder far Kinder
(Warsaw,
1930),
A Marne
(1931), and
Neie Lieder
(1941). S. Nepom of
Toronto wrote his
In Gerangel
(1926),
Pentes
(1928), and
Fun Meine Teg
(1940). Esther Segal published her
Lieder
(1928); Meier Segal his
Noente Erd
(1940); Mirl Shatan,
N i t
Fun Kein Freid
(1950); Chanah Steinberg,
Bleter in Vint
(1944). Sholem Shtern wrote
Inderfri
(1945),
Noentkeit
(1929),
and
Es Lichtigt
(1941); M. M. Shaffir,
A Steshke
(1940); S. Z.
Shneurson,
Bei Deine Toiern
(1943); A. S. Shkolnikov,
Lieder
(1926) and
In Licht fun Tog
(1939); and S. Apter
Tzvishn
Shtet
(Toronto, 1936).
Melech Grafstein issued a beautiful volume,
The Sholem
Aleichem Panorama
(London, Ontario, 1948), and two books
on I. L. Peretz (London, 1945; Tel Aviv, 1951); also the works
of Solomon Gilbert (1954) and
Fier Tragedies
by David Pinsky
(1949). His fellow-Londoner, Dr. Isidore Goldstick, is the
translator of H. Ayalti’s collection,
Yiddish Proverbs
(New York,
1949), of Sholem Aleichem’s
Inside Kasrilveke
(New York, 1948),
and a volume of Yehoash
Poems
(London, 1952). Rabbi J. L.
Zlotnik enriched Yiddish letters during his stay in Canada with
his essay on Jewish wit and humor as an introduction to Sholem
Miller’s
Funm Yiddishn Kval
(Winnipeg, 1957), with his
Shtud-
ien in dem Amolikn Innerlichn Yiddish Lebn,
and with his
translation of the
Song of Songs
and
Kohelet
into Yiddish.