Page 147 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 20

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W
iener
— J
ew i sh
L
iterary
A
nniversaries
141
federation of Conservative congregations in th United States and
Canada. Through its Commission on Jewish Education, it has
published a distinguished series of text books for religious schools.
M
e n a h em
M
en d e l
U
ss ishk in
.
100th anniversary of birth. Bom
in Dubrovna, Russia, August 17, 1863, died in Jerusalem, 1941.
A Zionist throughout his life, president of the Jewish National
Fund, he belongs to this list although he did not publish any
outstanding works, but it was he who backed the effort to estab-
lish the Hebrew University. Also his distinct preference of
Hebrew over Yiddish had a marked influence in helping decide
the language of the new Palestine.
A
b r a h am
W
a l t
(pseud.
A .
Liessin). 25th anniversary of death.
Born in Minsk, Russia, 1872, died in New York, November 5,
1938.
A
Yiddish journalist, identified politically with the Socialist
Bund, he was first Russian correspondent of the
Jewish Daily
Forward
in New York, and later after his emigration to America
at the turn of the century, a staff member of this newspaper,
but finally editor of the
Zukunft,
the outstanding Yiddish month-
ly in the United States.
M
e n a c h em
Z
a lm a n
W
o lfov sky
.
70th birthday. Born in Sur-
adge, Russia, 1893. In Palestine since 1921, he is considered one
of the outstanding Hebrew poets. His translations of Pushkin,
Tolstoy and Wassermann have also been acclaimed.
E
l iak im
Z
u n ser
.
50th anniversary of death. Born in Vilna,
Russia, 1845, died in New York, September 22, 1913. A
Badhan,
an entertainer at wedding with improvised poems and songs,
he was the most popular practitioner of this art. In America
from 1889 on, he extensively toured the country and published
over 600 songs in Yiddish, some of them translated into Hebrew.
E
l iezer
Z
eb i
Z
w e if e l
.
75th anniversary of death. Born in
Mogilev, Russia, 1815, died in Glukhov, Russia, February 20,
1888. A teacher in the government-sponsored rabbinical seminary
in Zhitomir, he published collections of ethical maxims from the
traditional literature and also attempted to reconcile Hasidism
and rabbinical Judaism in his
Shalom al YIsrael.