Page 163 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 22

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W
ien er
— A
m er ican
H
e b r ew
B
ooks
157
,/» .a .D?aana p n r nxa .nmnn ?y
d
^
w i t s
up? j pn x * ’ nnaa
/ay ry p .a"awn ,&?aana .•>.a
Commentary on the Pentateuch, by Isaac Greenblatt.
.na*?na D’wnm mawm ni^xw ,]iwx*i p^n : n a
•?
w n n aa n n i ^
.1963 ,.*» .a ,r?pna . r w p n r na?w nxa
Responsa and notes on the Halachah, by Rabbi Solomon Isaac Levin.
natrn msan *ayo Dy (D in mxa “no xini) n*ao , i ? a n m s a
Mishne
/p'rpna .ppn nwaa . . . n*> ?y nna i nmn . . . ma?n
Halachot Gedolot Institute, 1961-63. 2 v. 643 p.
On the 613 commandments, by Menashe Klein, the dean of a yeshivah in
Brooklyn.
noia n a n max
pwxn p^n i n n n n ?y x w i n i x a
.a"awn ,.•> .a ,xpov taaixa .nxaaix >i?n i n ‘rxiaw 'na nimiynm
Comments on the Pentateuch, notes on the Aggada and ethical exhorta­
tions, by Samuel David Unger.
inv>a w in , m * i » an ? y . . , D ’ 2 ? n * T . , . D , x , aa mn ^n a
T x a nxa .yiawn mwan pma pxiwa nnawi mxana na*an?
.x p^n .rown ,jw?a oiaia ,p?pna .*r?yaayai5a
Sermons, based on the Haftarah portions, also for special occasions, such
as Bar Mitzvah and weddings, by Meyer Blumenfeld, rabbi in Newark, N. J .
,p?pna.jnxonx'aw p n r *ioi* naaa . x " w n 7n o n a x a n i s o
/ay 165 .Town ,Dn*onn "imx
The addresses of Joseph Isaac Schneersohn, 1880-1950, the Habad leader
who came to this country at the beginning of World War II.
. . . iD ia n a i .*p?wnn mo nnaxa ?xnw* anaai n p a . . .
d
•»a n * aa
,.*» .a .Tnaynny i r y ^ x v/y ?"*
p
.ptnxnw *?xiaw nxa *inoai Dpi^a
/ay 724 .1963
About Tashlik, the traditional custom of symbolically casting one’s sins
upon flowing waters on Rosh Hashanah, by Samuel Schwarz.
na an nxa . n u n s mw a m n a p a y n x ’ a , o i da
1
p
/ay 57 .a"awn ^D’onoa'ip noain? o n w n n *ryi .a ,p?pna .rpan
Concerning Jewish law about items of low value, by Dov Ber Rivkin.
nxataxoa o n a w ’t: %rp Y ' la ix nxa . n n n ’ w n n o i a a i p
.D’ana 4 .1963“1962 ,p?pna . in w n v,y nyiawn *»aa lawna iw x
Sabbath and festival sermons by Joel Teitelbaum, the rabbi from Szatmar,
Hungary, now living in Brooklyn, N. Y.