Page 140 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 23

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J EWI SH L I T ERARY A N N I V E R S A R I E S
1966
B
y
T
heodore
W
ie n e r
T
h e
mo st
d y n am ic
m o v em e n t
in Jewish life of the past two
generations has been Zionism. And so it transpires that
several of the names we are remembering this year are in on
way or another connected with this important phase of our
modern history. Men like Leo Pinsker, the forerunner of Herzl;
David Ben-Gurion, whom destiny chose to play such an active
role in the fulfillment of this cherished ideal; Israel Goldstein,
an important American leader in the movement; Adolf Boehm,
Nathan Michael Gelber, and Joseph B. Schechtman, perceptive
historians and observers of its progress over the years; Robert
Weltsch, the journalist who fought the movement’s battles in
pre-Nazi Germany—all through their careers and their writings
dramatize the added dimension Zionism has brought to modern
Judaism.
Of American Jewish scholars we recall David Neumark, Solo-
mon Grayzel, Jacob Rader Marcus, David Werner Amram, Israel
Porath, Anita Libman Lebeson, and Sheldon Haas Blank.
Maurice Jacobs has earned for himself a special position in
American Jewish letters through his production of carefully
printed Jewish books.
Meir ben Gedaliah Lublin and Jacob Consino bring back the
distant past to us, whereas Moritz Steinschneider and Heinrich
Graetz remind us of the giant strides made by Jewish scholarship
during the nineteenth century.
Sholom Aleichem was a classic Yiddish writer who articulated
the feelings of the Jewish masses in Eastern Europe, whereas
Richard Beer-Hofmann, the assimilated Austrian Jew, tried to
express his Judaism in sensitive lyric poetry.
In their variety these writers span time, place and literary
mode of expression, and thus in their totality mirror the rich
texture of our literature.
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