Page 164 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 23

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J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
158
S
inger
, I
saac
B
ashevis
.
Short Friday and other stories. New York, Farrar,
Straus and Giroux, 1964. 243 p.
A collection of short stories by one of the great contemporary writers,
most of them concerning Polish Jews of an earlier century.
-------. The family Moskat. New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1965.
611 p.
A reissue of a novel first published in English in 1950. It remains
one of the important Jewish novels, describing as it does a Polish
Jewry later wiped out by the Germans.
V
an
D
yke
, H
enry
.
Ladies of the Rachmaninoff smile. New York, Farrar,
Straus and Giroux, 1965. 214 p.
A study of the relationship between two elderly women, one Jewish;
the other Negro.
V
idal
, N
icole
.
Emmanuel. New York, Viking, 1965. 400 p.
In the Jewish section of Cairo, Egypt, a Jewish mother believes that
she has conceived the Messiah for whom Jews have been waiting
for centuries. Emmanuel is that boy and the story carries him to
Israel, where the tale reaches its climax.
W
ilchek
, S
tella
.
Tale of a hero. New York, Harper and Row, 1965. 408 p.
A story of the early 1930’s, during the years of Hitler's rise to
power. It is a tale about rich Viennese Jews and the adventures of
one of them in Europe, South America and the United States.
W
ouk
, H
erm an
.
Don’t stop the carnival. New York, Doubleday, 1965.
395 p.
An “entertainment” by a popular novelist, in which the hero is an
American- Jewish public relations man who buys a hotel on a Caribbean
island.