Page 38 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 23

Basic HTML Version

J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
3 2
S
a m u e l
, M
a u r ic e
.
The World of Sholom Aleichem. N. Y., Knopf, 1956. 331 p.
Paperbound reprint:
N .
Y., Schocken, 1965.
A recreation of the internal world of Russian Jewry within the Pale
of Settlement through the retelling of the stories of Sholom Aleichem.
S
c hw ar z
, L
eo
W . ,
ed.
A
Golden Treasury of Jewish Literature.
N .
Y., Farrar
& Rinehart, 1937. 818 p.
An excellent anthology which includes stories dealing with Jewish life
in Russia as! well as brief essays, poems and plays by Russian Jewish
writers.
-------. The Jewish Caravan: Great Stories of Twenty-five Centuries. N. Y.,
Farrar & Rinehart, 1935. 768 p.
Of particular interest in this collection are the sections “Ghetto Lights
and Shadows,” “The World of Hasidism” and “New Frontiers: Soviet
Russia.”
S
h o l o m
A
l e ic h e m
.
Selected Stories of Sholom Aleichem. Introduction by
Alfred Kazin. N. Y., Modern Library, 1956. 432 p.
Tales filled with humor and pathos.
-------. Tevye's Daughters. Trans, by Frances Butwin. Illus. by Ben Shahn.
N. Y., Crown, 1949. 302 p.
A choice selection of short stories, well translated.
-------. The Old Country. Trans, by Julius and Frances Butwin. Illus. by Ben
Shahn. N. Y., Crown, 1946. 434 p.
A choice selection of short stories, well translated.
S
ing er
, I
saac
B
a sh ev is
.
The Family Moskat. Trans, from Yiddish by
A .
H.
Gross. N. Y., Farrar, Straus &Giroux, 1950. 611 p.
A portrayal of the vanished civilization of East European Jews by one
of the great writers of today.
S
in g er
, I
srael
J. The Brothers Ashkenazi. Trans, by Maurice Samuel. N. Y.,
Knopf, 1936. 642 p. Paperbound reprint: N. Y., World, 1963.
A powerful novel of life in Russian Poland of the nineteenth century.
*------ . East of Eden. Trans, by Maurice Samuel. N. Y., Knopf, 1939. 403 p.
A novel set in Poland and Soviet Russia during its early years.
V
in o k u r
, G
r igory
.
The Commissar: A Novel of Stalinist Russia. N. Y.,
Twayne, 1965. 371 p.
The hero of this “fictional treatment of events that actually occurred”
is a Jew, a writer and a commissar. The author, himself a Jew and a
Soviet writer, was an officer in the Red Army who left Russia and came
to the U. S.
POETRY
* A
u s u b e l
, N
a t h a n
and
M
a r y n n
,
eds.
A
Treasury of Jewish Poetry.
N .
Y.,
Crown, 1957. 471 p.
For poems by Russian Jewish poets, see the following in the “Bio-
graphical Index of Authors”: Ansky, Antokolsky, Bagritsky, Bialik, Brody,
Der Nistor, Ehrenburg, Frug, Gordon, Grade, Halkin, Hirshbein, Hofstein,
KushnirofF, Kwitko, Lebensohn, Markish, Minsky, Nadson, Nahman of
Bratzlav, Pasternak, Rosenfeld, Scheneour, Sutzkever, Tchnernichowsky,
Wintchevsky, Yehoash.