Page 43 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 23

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37
H
eskes
— J
ew ish
M
usic
L
itera ture
The collection
Songs of Childhood,
selected and edited by
Judith Eisenstein and Frieda Prensky, was published in 1955
by the United Synagogue Commission on Jewish Education.
With simple piano accompaniments, this 321-page book presents
250 melodies arranged topically according to Sabbath and
festival, Israel and general subjects, with texts in Hebrew as
well as in English. Handsomely printed, the book is a fine
educational resource for the pre-school and early primary school
age levels.
His torical Surveys
During the past fifteen years there has been increased interest
in the history of Jewish music and a number of significant works
in this area have been produced.
The Music of Israel: Its Rise
and Growth Through 5,000 Years,
written by the prominent
Israeli music critic Peter Gradenwitz, was published by W. W.
Norton in 1949. The book is a 334-page detailed survey which
highlights many important musical epochs in terms of Jewish
history and documents interesting information in a well-organ-
ized text. Among its supplementary features are a chronological
table of Jewish cultural history, a list of Biblical music refer-
ences, and a bibliography for each chapter of the book.
The
Music of the Jews: An Historical Appreciation
by Aron Marko
Rothmueller was published in 1954 by the Beechhurst Press.
This 254-page book has recently been made available in a good
paperback edition. Written by a European-educated cantor
and composer, it surveys in a non-technical manner the music
of Biblical times, the developments in synagogue music from
the first Dispersal to the present time, and the general Jewish
musical creativity of the 19th and 20th centuries. A Canadian
writer, Israel Rabinovitch, published a collection of his essays
and reviews
Of Jewish Music: Ancient and Modern
in 1952.
Translated into English from the original Yiddish by A. M.
Klein, this 321-page book released by The Book Center of
Montreal, covers a wide area of Jewish music history. Though
organized in an informal manner, it has much new information
to impart, and Rabinovitch’s strong opinions are extremely
interesting.
Alfred Sendrey, in collaboration with Mildred Norton, wrote
David's Harp: The Story of Music in Biblical Times,
which
was published in 1964 by NAL-World Division of the New
American Library. Sponsored by the Jewish Heritage Founda-
tion, this 288-page book presents a narrative of Jewish musical
origins during early Biblical times, through the rise of the
Temple of Solomon and its music, the era of the Jewish kings