Page 41 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 24

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S t a r k m a n — Y idd ish L i t e r a r y C r i t i c i sm
33
bu t who gained his renown as a writer while living on Rum an ian
soil.
Yaakov Glatshtein, among the highest rank ing Yiddish poets
of our time, who comments every week and often twice weekly
on the Yiddish literary scene, has enlarged w ith three volumes
the series of books
In Tokh Genumen
he started to publish in
1947. These deal almost entirely w ith curren t writers and works.
Two of the new volumes were published in Buenos Aires (1960),
and the th ird is titled
M it Maine Fartog B ikher
(Tel Aviv,
1963). Glatshtein comments occasionally on the general literary
scene in the Un ited States. His poetry was dealt with in separate
studies by two o ther poets—Mattes Deich in
Yaakov Glatshtein,
der Yeed fun Leed
(Tel Aviv, 1963) and Eliezer Greenberg in
Yaakov Glatshtein’s Freyd fun Yidishn Vort
(New York, 1964).
Previously Greenberg published his study
Grunt Problemen in
H . Leivick’s Shaffn
(New York, 1961). Although H. Leivick was
chiefly a poet and playwright, his posthumous book
Essayen un
Redes,
compiled by Yisroel Zilberberg (New York, 1963), con­
tains a number of literary evaluations of high critical merit.
A. Glanz-Leyeles, the high-ranking poet who has been also
a fruitful essayist and critic since his early literary activity
included only a few of his many reviews and evaluations in his
only book of essays and reminiscences
Veit un Vort
(New York,
1958). Glanz-Leyeles, Glatshtein and the late N. B. Minkov were
the co-founders of the
In Z ikh
(Introspective) school of Yiddish
poetry. In later years Minkov gained renown as a historian of
Yiddish literature and as a critic. Minkov gave expression to his
creativity in these fields in the three volumes of his
Pyonern fun
Yidisher Poezye in Amerike
(New York, 1956). They contain
biographic-critical studies dealing with Yiddish social poets in
the United States between 1875 and 1914.
A copious essayist, book reviewer and literary biographer was
Nakhman Maizl. He died in Israel in April, 1966, several years
after emigrating from the United States. Maizl’s books, published
while he was a resident of New York, include the following
issued w ithin the past decade:
N oen te un Eigene
(New York,
1957);
Dos Yidishe Shaffn un der Yidisher Shraiber in Sovetn-
Farband
(New York, 1959);
Tsurikb likn un Perspektivn
(Tel
Aviv, 1962). Maizl was the au tho r of a standard Peretz biography
and he edited a collection of Peretz’s letters and speeches.
T o the productive critics of a younger generation belongs
Yekhezkel Bronstein, whose books published since Niger’s pass­
ing include the following collections of essays and reviews of
current Yiddish literature:
Unter Ein Dakh
(Los Angeles, 1956);
Ineinem un Bazunder
(Tel Aviv, 1960);
Fun Ein Hoiz
(Tel
Aviv, 1963);
In Pardes fun Yiddish
(Tel Aviv, 1965). T o this