Page 21 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 25

Basic HTML Version

I N T R O D U C T I O N
By A. A l a n
S
t e in b a c h
I
S
e v e r a l r e a s o n s
invest Volume 25, the jubilee volume of the
Jewish Book Annual,
with a significance more arresting than
its twenty-four forerunners.
First, it is a Golden Anniversary tribute to our sponsor and
coordinator, the National Jewish Welfare Board, whose encour-
agement and support played a major role in the development and
growth of the
Annual.
Throughout their tumultuous history
Jews have built on the substance of time. A half century is, of
course, a minuscule fragment in the millennial continuum that
encompasses Jewish chronology. But despite their brief span,
the past fifty years—this writer’s affiliation with JWB goes back
to September 1917 when, during World War I, he served as
Jewish Board for Welfare Work [sic] Head Worker at Camp
Meade, Md.—have witnessed a dynamic and ever increasing com■
plex of JWB projects, enterprises, objectives and achievements
whose prodigious impact contributed greatly to enhancing the
stature of the American Jewish community.
Bernard Postal’s essay in this volume on “ JWB’s Role in Ameri-
can Jewish Cultural Life” expounds the method and the manner
in which JWB provided constructive impetus to Jewish cultural
activity in America.
A second compelling reason is that this volume celebrates the
twenty-fifth anniversary both of the Jewish Book Council of
America and of the
Jewish Book Annual.
In the context of time’s
expansive web, the past twenty-five years appear less than a hy-
phen; and yet it is earnestly hoped that both the Council and
the
Annual
have vindicated their raison d’etre. The Jewish Book
Council has won recognition as a solid, reliable, cultural edifice
upon the American Jewish scene. Even more, it vibrates with a
vigor that reaches beyond our shores; it has established a branch
in Israel under the guidance of Dr. Sol Liptzin, and renders serv-
ice to Jewish communities also in other lands.
As for the
Jewish Book Annual,
we shall leave to others the
passing of judgment upon our humble efforts. It seems reason-
1