Page 157 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

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J EWI SH L I TERARY A N N I V E R S A R I E S
19 7 1
B
y
T
heodore
W
ien er
N
o
s ingle
book
in modern Jewish literature has exerted greater
influence on Jewish life than
Der Judenstaat
by Theodor
Herzl, published in 1896. It electrified the Jewish world, trans-
forming the small Hibbat Zion movement in Eastern Europe into
the dynamic Zionist movement under Herzl’s leadership which
captured the imagination of all segments of world Jewry, while
arousing passionate opposition in many quarters. I t called forth
a torrent of pamphlet literature pro and con, quickening the
pulse of Jewish life everywhere.
Indirectly, at least, all the modern Hebrew writers whom we
recognize this year owe much to Herzl's inspiration. Most of them
grew up in an atmosphere charged with the excitement of this
new idea, promising a better day to all those suffering the hard-
ships of the East European ghetto. They did their part in bringing
the vision to fulfillment by helping to fashion the old language
into the new as a unifying force for the multitudes that came to
settle in Israel.
A milestone in the cultural life of American Jewry is the
fiftieth anniversary of
Ha-Doar,
the only Hebrew weekly appear-
ing in this country. We also recognize one of the few Hebrew
writers who grew up in this country, Abraham Regelson.
Of medieval rabbis we recall Jacob ben Meir, called Rabbenu
Tam, and Baruch ben Samuel, of Mainz.
Thus, both the distant and the recent past are brought back to
us as we contemplate the lives of the men who have enriched our
heritage.
Chronological List
Without definite date: Hillel Zeitlin.
January: 7, Abraham Meir Habermann; 15, William Chomsky;
20, Abraham Kahana.
February: 1, Jacob Horowitz, Abraham E. Millgram.
March: 1, Solomon Grayzel; 5, Jacob Rader Marcus; 6, Joseph
Herman Hertz, Isaac Elhanan Spector; 16, Avigdor Apto•
witzer.