Page 195 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

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A M E R I C A N J EWI S H F I C T I O N BOOK S
1 9 6 9 - 1 9 7 0
By
H
arold
U.
R
ibalow
A
gnon
,
S. Y. Twenty-one stories. New York, Schocken, 1970. 287
p.
This is a most valuable collection of stories by the only Hebrew author
to have won the Nobel Prize. Most of the tales are unfamiliar to the
English-language reader and they offer an insight into Agnon’s range
and literary gifts. They are translated from the Hebrew by various
hands. The collection is edited by Nahum N. Glatzer, who includes
notes on each of the stories.
A
ngoff
, C
harles
.
Winter twilight. New York, Yoseloff, 1970. 474 p.
The eighth volume in Charles Angoff’s ongoing massive work on
American Jewish life. This novel covers the years of 1946-47 and
includes an account of the creation of the State of Israel by the United
Nations, as well as descriptions of a wide range of Jewish and Christian
characters who seek their identity as individuals and happiness in a
complex society.
A
ngoff
, C
harles
and
L
evin
, M
eyer
.
The rise of American Jewish litera-
ture. New York, Simon and Schuster, 1970. 988 p.
Two prominent American Jewish writers here offer selections from
22 Jewish novels, including
The Rise of David Levinsky, Journey to
the Dawn, Call I t Sleep, The Island Within, The Old Bunch, The
Assistant, Marjorie Morningstar, Stern, Herzog
and
The Chosen.
There
is an introduction and preface to each selection.
A
rnothy
, C
hristine
.
Shalom, Aviva! New York, McKay, 1970. 209
p.
A pleasant, humorous novel about a French photographer who returns
to Israel to find the Israeli girl with whom he thinks he is in love,
and meanwhile learns quite a bit about the land itself. Translated from
the French by Monroe Steams.
B
abel
, I
saac
. Y
ou
must know everything: stories, 1915-1937. New York,
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1969. 283 p.
The great Russian-Jewish short story writer, who was murdered
in a Soviet purge, grows in stature as previously untranslated stories
are made available in English. The title story is a particularly good
one and is one of the four Jewish stories tha t appear here as rediscov-
eries. This volume includes 19 tales never before translated, six pieces
of journalism, an interview with Babel and memoirs and essays on him.
The book is edited by his daughter Nathalie Babel and translated
from the Russian by Max Hayward.
B
assani
, G
iorgio
.
The heron. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, 1970.
179 p.
An Italian Jew, who has survived World War I I by hiding in Switzer-
land, reflects on his life in middle-age. At the same time, the author
conveys the character and personality of a Jewish-Italian community.
Translated from the Italian by William Weaver.
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