Page 200 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

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J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
194
S
inger
, I
saac
B
ashevis
.
The estate. New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux,
1969. 374 p.
This is a sequel to
The Manor
and, taken together, the two volumes
constitute an extensive, interesting chronicle of Jewish family life in a
Poland just about emerging into the twentieth century. Unlike Mr.
Singer’s stories of devils and elves,
The Manor
and
The Estate
are old-
fashioned novels, well-made, full of plot and books tha t illuminate
Jewish life and the problems of Jews entering the freer world ready to
accept them as human beings.
S
inger
,
I. J. Steel and iron. New York, Funk & Wagnalls, 1969. 267 p.
This is the first English-language publication (translated by the
author’s son Joseph Singer) of a popular Yiddish novel about Jewish
life in Poland in 1915. I t is the tale of a Jewish soldier who deserts
from the Russian Army, hides in Warsaw and works with refugees
whom he develops into men and women who attempt to better their
circumstances.
S
ukenick
, R
onald
.
The death of the novel and other stories. New York,
Dial, 1969. 175 p.
A blend of fiction and non-fiction, in which the author enters the
fictional stories as himself. The scene is the lower East Side and there
are Jewish themes and elements in the book.
Updike,
J
o h n
.
Bech:
a
book. New York, Knopf,
1 9 7 0 . 2 2 4
p.
Seven short stories, all interrelated, and all about a Jewish writer
named Henry Bech.
W
eidman
, J
erome
.
The center of the action. New York, Random House,
1969. 367 p.
Ted Leff, a modern Sammy Glick, moves through the publishing
world, as Mr Weidman returns to the style, pace and dialogue of his
early, and most successful, books.
W
iesel
, E
lie
.
A beggar in Jerusalem. New York, Random House, 1970.
221 p.
Elie Wiesel is a messenger of the meaning of the Holocaust to the
Jewish people, and the world. In his new book, he deals with the Six
Day War, the Western Wall and the confrontation between the eternal
Jew and the terrors of the twentieth century.
W
ilchek
, S
tella
.
Judith. New York, Harper & Row, 1969. 589 p.
The heroine here is Judith, the woman who killed the general Holo-
femes. This is a retelling of the tale told in the Book of Jud ith in the
Apocrypha, but with many liberties and romantic deviations.
W
olff
, G
eoffrey
.
Bad debts. New York, Simon and Schuster, 1969. 222 p.
The hero of this novel is a “loser” in life, Benjamin Freeman, a bad
father and husband, an evil man. Most of the other characters tha t in-
habit this book are misfits in our contemporary society.
Y
affe
. J
ames
The voyage of the Franz Joseph. New York, G. P. Putnam’s
Sons, 1970. 464 p.
This narrative is based on an actual event and tells the story of a
ship carrying 1000 German-Jewish refugees across the Atlantic in 1939,
just before the outbreak of World War II .