Page 201 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

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J EWI S H J U V E N I L E BOOKS
1 9 6 9 - 1 9 7 0
B y R u t h
C.
K
a n n e r
A
brahams
, B
eth
-Z
ion
.
The Jews in England: a history for young people.
Hartford, Conn., Hartmore House, 1969. 224 p.
This newly revised edition tells the story of Jewish settlement in Eng-
land from Roman times to the present, (ages 13 & up)
B
alas
, S
himon
.
The shoes of Tanboury. N.Y. Sabra Books, 1969. 40 p.
A classic Yemenite fantasy about a pair of shoes which will not give
out. (ages 5-8)
B
lock
, I
rvin
.
Neighbor to the world. Photo illus. N.Y., Thos. Y. Crowell,
1969. 218 p.
A biography of Lillian Wald, her work among the underprivileged
as public health nurse and founder of the Henry Street Settlement
House. The socially aware reader will easily spot the similarity be-
tween settlement programs to help immigrant Jews at the turn of the
century and programs like “Headstart” endeavoring to give help to
the underprivileged of th e ’70s. (10-13)
B
orland
, K
atheryn
K.,
and
S
peicher
, H
elen
R. Harry Houdini: boy
magician. Illus. by Fred Irvin. N.Y., Bobbs-Merrill, 1969. 200 p. (Child-
hood of famous Americans series)
Ehrich Weiss, son of an immigrant Hungarian rabbi, grows up to
become the famous magician and escape artist. Though the biography
does not stress Judaism or its influence on Houdini, this version, for the
5 to 8 year olds, is better than most. (5-8)
B
raverman
, L
ibbie
L.,
and
S
ilver
, S
amuel
M. The six-day warriors. Photo
illus. N.Y., Bloch, 1969. 165 p.
A biographical collection of outstanding leaders during the Six-Day
War. These “fighters of necessity not choice” include some personalities
less well known to American youth. Notes on the roles of Generals
Dayan and Rabin, and Minister Abba Eban are, of course, included.
The book has end paper maps of the six days’ events and campaigns.
(10-13)
C
oopersmith
, J
erome
.
A Hanukah fable for Christmas. Illus. by Syd Hoff.
N.Y., G. P. Putnam, 1969. 48 p.
A boy, flying atop a
dreidl
over the Bronx, seeks to find additional
happiness in Christmas after the joys of Hanukah have left. The book
does a great disservice to children of both the Christian and Jewish
faiths. I t not only fails to be funny; but by linking these two holidays,
it fails to teach children the respect and sanctity the separateness of
Hanukah and Christmas should bring. (4-7)
D
elessert
, E
tienne
,
and
S
chmid
, E
leanore
.
The endless party. N.Y.,
Harlin Quist Books, 1970. 32 p.
Two crows are sent as messengers bearing an invitation to animals
from Capt. Noah. This full color illustrated book tells the Noah story
from an original point of view—tha t of the animals. (4-7)
195