Page 202 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

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J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
196
E
delman
, L
ily
.
Israel; new people in an old land. Camden, N .J., Thos.
Nelson, 1969. rev. ed. 224 p.
This sociological history was revised to include updated demographic
material and current problems. (13-15)
E
isenberg
, A
zriel
.
Jewish historical treasures. Photo illus. N.Y., Bloch,
1969. 207 p.
A handsomely executed volume containing pictures of significant arti-
facts and interesting sites in Jewish history from biblical times to the
present. Many of the narratives accompanying each pictured presenta-
tion are written with no more enthusiasm than a museum catalogue.
Fortunately, the material and its innate interest will engender its own
excitement. (13 & up)
E
isenberg
, A
zriel
,
and
G
lobe
, L
eah
A
in
,
eds. Sabra children: stories of
fun and adventure in Israel. Illus. by Gabe Josefson, N.Y., Jonathan
David, 1969. 252 p.
The editors have compiled and translated twenty-five stories repre-
senting Israeli life as seen by Israeli authors. (8-12)
E
liav
, A
riel
L. Voyage of the Ulua. Trans, by Israel I. Taslitt, N.Y., Sabra
Books, 1969. 191 p.
The U lua carried eight hundred “illegals.” The book, written by its
captain, describes the drama of the voyage to Palestine. I t includes a
glossary, route map and a follow-up chapter, “Where are they now.”
(young adults)
F
ishman
, I
sidore
.
Remember the days of old: an introduction to biblical
history. Foreword by Azriel Eisenberg. Hartford, Conn., Hartmore
House, 1969. 189 p.
Faithfully following the biblical narrative from Abraham to Ezra and
Nehemiah, the author retells the history in simple language. (13 & up)
F
orman
, J
ames
.
My enemy, my brother. N.Y., Meredith, 1969. 250 p.
Through the stories of six teenage “illegals,” the author has given
us a microcosm of the drive of the remnants of the Holocaust to reach
the haven of Palestine. Only three survive the foot journey from
Poland to Italy and the struggle to reach
Eretz Yisrael.
The author has
an unusual ability to go back and forth in time without losing intensity
or momentum. He is most perceptive of the role of the human condition
on human value. The book received the 1969 Children’s Spring Festival
Book World Award. (13 and up)
G
lasgow
, A
line
.
Pair of shoes. Illus. by Symeon Shimon, N.Y., Dial, 1969.
48 p.
A poor, 19th century Jew is obsessed by the desire for a pair of
shoes. When they are shared grudgingly, an accident occurs. (8-12)
G
old
, S
harlya
.
The potter5s four sons. Illus. by Jules Maidoff. N.Y., Dou-
bleday, 1969. 47 p.
This is an allegory of a potter and his four sons, each of whom ini-
tially rejects his fa th e rs life style. The Hanukah
gelt,
given them to
find their own thing, runs out the next Hanukah. Each son, having con-
firmed his individuality, returns to find the acceptance of “se lf’ is a
vital p a rt of family cohesiveness. The book is real now and a joy to
readers of all ages.
G
rossman
, L
adislav
.
Window on Main Street. Illus. by Victor Ambrus.
Trans, by Iris Urwin. N.Y., Doubleday, 1970. 123 p.
A highly acclaimed movie, then novel, has now been scaled down for