Page 203 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

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197
K
a n n e r
—J
ew ish
J
u v en ile
B
ooks
the younger reader. An impoverished, Czechoslovakian carpenter is
assigned as the “aryanizer” of Mrs. Lautman’s button shop. The book
is an outstanding character study. (13 and up)
H
azen
, B
arbara
S
hook
.
Noah’s ark. Illus. by Tibor Gergely. N.Y., Golden,
1969. unpaged.
This inexpensive, illustrated book, although true to the Old Testa-
ment story, is bland and makes for dull reading. (5-8)
H
eckelman
, D
evorah
.
Hanukah and the young child. N.Y., Jewish Educa-
tion Committee, 1969. 64 p.
A very complete and concise book of Hanukah stories and activities
for pre-school children and their parents. (3-5 /adu lt)
H
elfer
, J
udith
.
The aleph bet for you. N.Y., Shengold, 1969. unpaged.
A paperbound book which has pictorial and verbal illustrations and
transliteration of the Hebrew alphabet. Some of the illustrative vocabu-
lary goes beyond the ken of the average pre-schooler. Books of this kind
tend to be uninspiring, including this one. (4-7)
H
irsh
, M
arilyn
.
Where is Yonkela? Illus. by the author. N.Y., Crown,
1969. unpaged.
Yonkela is lost. His mother seeks the aid of the town’s people and
rabbi in her search. The story’s solution is either ludicrous or frighten-
ing depending on one’s age. The book is essentially a picturebook util-
izing brightly colored, bucolic artwork; therefore, the story can be for-
given. As a picture book it has merit. (3-5)
I
rving
, C
lifford
.
The battle of Jerusalem. N.Y., Macmillan, 1970. 96 p.
(Macmillan Battle Book series)
The book’s focus is on the battle for Jerusalem during the Six Day
War and the reunification of the Holy City. I t includes battle maps,
chronology, reading list and index. (9-13)
I
sh
-K
ishor
, S
ulamith
.
Our Eddie. N.Y., Pantheon, 1969. 183 p.
This book has a twofold tragedy. One is Eddie’s death as a result of an
operation. The other, greater tragedy, is the inability of the Raphael
children to communicate with their father, a dedicated Hebrew teacher.
Set in New York of two generations ago, this sensitive novel dealing
with the communication and value gaps of differing generations, is
most timely. I t is the winner of the Shirley Kravitz Children’s Book
Award of the Association of Jewish Libraries and was a runner-up for
the Newberry Award. (13 & up)
J
acobs
, L
ouis
.
Jewish ethics, philosophy and mysticism. Illus. by Irwin
Rosenbaum. N.Y., Behrman House, 1969. 171 p.
A book of selective passages on ethics, philosophy and mysticism drawn
from classic Jewish works. The quotations pertaining to specifics, e.g.,
truth, honesty, prayer, etc. are substantive. The book contains a glossary
of terms; a teacher’s workbook is also available. (13-15)
K
laperman
, L
ibby
M. The five brothers Maccabee, N.Y., Sabra Books,
1969. 176 p.
This novel is based on the Hanukah story. While it is not markedly
unusual in its approach or interpretation for young people, there is an
intangible immediacy about it tha t the reader will perceive and appre-
ciate. (11-13)
K
lapholz
, Y
isroel
.
Stories of Eliyahu Hanovi: Part I. N.Y., Philipp Feld-
heim, 1970. 246 p.