Page 48 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

Basic HTML Version

J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
4 2
with articles on Palestine and especially on its Jewish popula•
tion in Luncz' time. The
Luah
appeared for twenty-one years
(1895-1916) and was the prototype for many later annuals and
almanacs. Thus, from the earliest days of the new Yishuv in
Palestine, periodicals were a regular feature of the Palestinian
scene, and one can see in them the antecedents of the hun-
dreds of periodicals published during the Mandate period as
well as the thousands of periodicals that have appeared in
Israel since the establishment of the State of Israel.
Scholarly Judaica Periodicals
In the short space of an article, one can merely point out
the general features of this vast literary panorama and touch
upon only a few of the individual periodicals themselves. Per-
haps the most familiar to the segment of the American public
involved with Jewish, especially Hebrew, culture are the schol-
arly periodicals in the various areas of Jewish studies:
Tarbits
(humanities) and
K irya t Sefer
(bibliography), both published
by the Hebrew University;
Tsiyon
(history), published by the
Historical Society of Israel;
Leshonenu
(Hebrew philology),
published by the Academy of the Hebrew Language;
Erets
Yisrael
(Palestinography), published by the Israel Exploration
Society;
Bet Mikra
(Bible), published by the Israel Society for
Biblical Research and the World Jewish Bible Society;
Sinai
(rabbinics), published by the Rav Kook Institute, and
Moznayim
(Hebrew literature), published by the Hebrew Authors As-
sociation.
Not so well known, however, are the various scholarly jour*
nals which are concerned primarily with areas outside the field
of Jewish studies:
lyun
(philosophy), published by the Israel
Philosophical Society;
Ha-Mizrah he-Hadash
(Middle Eastern
studies), published by the Israel Oriental Society;
Ha-Peraklit
(law), published by the Israel Bar Association in cooperation
with the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University—to cite but
three in the humanities and social sciences. In the natural
sciences, there is an even greater array of scholarly journals
representing virtually every area of Israeli scientific research:
Israel Journal of Botany, Israel Journal of Chemistry, Israel
Journal of Earth Sciences, Israel Journal of Technology, Israel
Journal of Zoology, Israel Journal of Medical Sciences, Israel
Journal of Mathematics—
all published by Israel’s National
Council for Research and Development—to name a few.
Israel Government Publications
When one ventures beyond these scholarly journals, how-
ever, the American reader, and indeed, in many cases, the Is­