Page 51 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 28

Basic HTML Version

4 5
B
erl in
— I
rael i
P
eriodicals
specific issue publish periodicals. These range from the more
substantial periodicals such as the English-language
New Out-
look,
published by a group seeking Arab-Jewish friendship, to
the more ephemeral newsletter of the League for Abolishment
of Religious Coercion in Israel. The Six Day War of 1967
also gave rise to a number of periodicals such as
Zot ha-Arets,
published by the irredentist Movement for the Whole Land
of Israel.
The diverse origins of a large proportion of the Israeli pop-
ulation are also reflected in its periodical press. Many of the
“landsmanschaften” issue bulletins; e.g., the Association of
Americans and Canadians in Israel, the Hitahdut Olej Buko-
wina (association of immigrants from Bukowina, Rumania).
The oriental Jewish communities also issue a number of period-
icals:
Afikim
(Yemenite Jews),
Ba-Ma’arakhah
and
Israel’s Ori-
ental Problem
(Council of the Sephardic community of Jerusa-
lem). There is even a journal (
Tevunah
) published by the
Bukharan Jewish community in the Bukharan dialect in Heb׳
rew characters.
In a country where Judaism plays such a central role, it is
not surprising to find a large number of periodicals dealing
with various aspects of the Jewish religion. Since all personal
law is, in effect, religious law, there are a number of govern-
mental publications dealing with religious law; e.g., the
Piske
Din
(judgments) of the Rabbinical Courts; bulletins and guides
to kashrut issued by the Chief Rabbinate; and the journals
published by the various local religious councils such as
Be-
Sha’arayikh
(Jerusalem),
Halikhot
(Tel-Aviv) and
Orahot
(Haifa). Hekhal Shelomoh, the seat of the Chief Rabbinate,
publishes
Shanah be-Shanah,
an annual dealing with religious
life in Israel, including a bibliography of religious books pub-
lished during the year. Several of the periodicals published by
the religious parties have been mentioned above; to these
can be added the Neture Karta (ultra-Orthodox) publications
Ha-’Edah
and
Mishmeret Homatenu.
Religious groups in various other segments of Israeli life
also publish journals; e.g.,
’Amudim
(the religious kibbuts move-
ment);
Ha-’Oved ha-Dati
(the religious workers in the Histad-
rut labor union);
De’ot
(religious students and academicians);
Zera’im
(Bnai Akiva religious youth movement);
Bi-Sede Hemed
(religious teachers association). There are several popular jour-
nals of religious interest: the illustrated
Panim el Panim,
pub-
lished by the Jewish Orientation Fellowship;
Bet Ya’akov,
pub-
lished by the Beth Jacob Schools; and the traditionalist Yiddish
language
Dos Yidishe L ikh t.
A great many periodicals deal with various aspects of Jewish