Page 145 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 29

Basic HTML Version

139
R
iba l ow
—A
merican
J
ew ish
F
iction
B
ooks
K
an iu k
, Y
o r am
.
Adam resurrected. New York, Atheneum, 1971. 370 p.
Mr. Kaniuk is a writer whose earlier novels didn’t win the attention
they deserved. Again, he has given us a vivid work of fiction. This time
(as in
H imm o )
the setting is among sick people, an institution for people
who have been driven mad by the rigors of the concentration camps.
The hospital is in an Israeli desert and the central character is a Jew
who had once been a circus clown whose life had been spared to set at
ease those Jews marching to the gas chambers.
K
a p l a n
, B
ernard
.
Prisoners of this world. New York, Grossman, 1970. 177 p.
Mr. Kaplan’s first collection of stories reveals talent and originality
of vision. Some of the tales are about Jews, most peculiar and curious
Jews, but nevertheless intriguing people.
K
l an e
, R
obert
.
Where’s poppa? New York, Random House, 1970 150 p.
A Jewish bachelor finds that his old mother interferes with his sex
life. A vulgar book.
K
ollek
, A
mo s
.
Don’t ask me
i f I
love. New York, Evans, 1971. 292
p .
This first novel, written by the son of Jerusalem’s Mayor, has won
the M. Evans Fiction Award, which carried a $15,000 advertising budget.
Predictably, the story is set in Israel and there is lots of love-making but,
surprisingly, indifference to the nation, its people and its problems.
K
utn ick
, A
aron
A .
In search of happiness. Detroit, Harlo Press, 1970. 204
p .
An autobiographical novel of the author’s experience in Eastern
Europe and in the United States.
L
ange
, S
u za n n e
.
The year. New York,
S .
G. Phillips, 1970. 188 p.
This is clearly an autobiographical account of a young American
woman’s life on an Israeli kibbutz over the course of a year. Her experi-
ences, and the experiences of a large American group of “kibbutzniks”
are acutely and pleasantly drawn.
L
ieber
, J
oel
.
The circle game. New York, Simon 8c Schuster. 1970. 349
p .
A humorous novel about a Jewish professor, his pregnant wife, an
intellectual circle, sex and Jewish mothers.
M
ark field
, W
allace
.
Teitlebaum’s window. New York, Knopf, 1970. 387
p .
If you think that Markfield’s
T o an Early Grave
was hilarious,
Teitle•
baum ’s W indow
may also tickle your funnybone. It blends nostalgia
with vinegar, humor with vulgarity and so-called Jewish life with a
Jewish life most of us never knew. Still, Markfield has his cult. The book
deals with the boyhood of Simon Sloan in Brooklyn and takes us, if
we wish to make the trip, to World War II.
M
c
M
e n a m in
, T
h om a s
.
Call me Manneschewitz. New York, Scribners, 1971.
239 p.
A minor work of fiction about an Irishman and a Jewess who, after
many obstacles placed in their way, marry.
OzrcK , C
ynthla
. T h e p a g a n r a b b i .
New
Y o rk , K n o p f ,
1971. 270
p .
Seven short stories, some of them brilliant, by one of the best new
writers on the American literary scene.The title story has gained fame
long before its inclusion in this collection, and so has “Envy; or Yiddish
in America,” a wickedly funny story based on the writing career of one
of our most notable Yiddish novelists.