Page 31 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 29

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B
erlin
—J
ew ish
B
ibliograph ic
J
ournals
25
foundation for the subsequent development of Jewish biblio-
graphic journals.
The period between the two world wars was one of great devel-
opment for the Jewish bibliographic press. The heir to the position
of primacy enjoyed by
HB
and Z
fHB
was
Kirjath Sepher
(
KS) ,
the bibliographic quarterly of the Jewish National and Hebrew
University Library.
KS
began publication in 1924 and to-date some
forty-six volumes have appeared.
KS
has maintained the dual
approach of bibliographic lists and scholarly articles of a biblio-
graphic nature that had been started by
HB
and
ZfHB.
Each
issue of
KS
contains two bibliographies: 1., books printed in Israel;
and 2., Judaica printed outside Israel. Each is arranged according
to a detailed classification scheme. In addition, there is a section
in which articles of interest to Jewish scholarship found in the
general and Jewish periodical press are cited —reminiscent of
the “Journallese” of the
HB.
More than a thousand books have
been reviewed in the pages of
KS,
while over eight hundred schol-
arly articles have appeared to-date. The hundred and twenty-three
articles by the late Avraham Yaari, bibliographer
par excellence
of the last forty years, should be singled out as being of special
significance. Other noted bibliographers whose work is to be found
in the pages of
KS
include A. M. Habermann (17 articles), H. Lib-
erman (32 articles) and the late I. Sonne (34 articles). Among the
scholars whose studies are especially well represented are G. Scho-
lem (49 articles) and the late S. Assaf (27 articles). Virtually every
area of Jewish bibliography, indeed of Jewish studies, is repre-
sented. With its comprehensive listing of Israeli publications,
KS
is
the closest approximation of an Israeli national bibliography
available.* When the list of Judaica published in the Diaspora
is added to the list of Israeli publications,
KS
becomes de facto
the national bibliography of the Jewish people. By continuing to
maintain the balance of scholarly articles and bibliographic list-
ings,
KS
proved itself to be a worthy heir and successor to
HB
and
ZfHB.
Diversification of Bibliographic Periodicals
The interwar period saw the beginnings of a diversification and
specialization of bibliographic periodicals. Hitherto the field had
been dominated virtually exclusively by the German-language
HB
and
ZfHB.
Already a change of major significance had taken
place; the chief bibliographic journal was now published in Jeru-
salem and in Hebrew, reflecting the gradual transition of the center
*Since April 1964 the monthly
Accessions List: Israel,
published in Tel-Aviv by
the Library of Congress’ Public Law 480 Project, has also provided bibliogra-
phic data similar to that of a national bibliography.