Page 136 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 30

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124
J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
E
lm a n
, R
ichard
.
Fredi & Shirl & the kids. New York, Scribners, 1972. 198
p.
“An autobiography in fable,” this work is offered as fiction by a
talented Jewish writer who draws on his own life as a boy growing up
in Brooklyn from twenty to thirty years ago.
E
pstein
, S
eymou r
.
The dream museum. New York, Doubleday, 1971. 297 p.
Mr. Epstein deserves to be known and read more widely than he is.
A thoughtful and civilized artist, each of his novels is excellent for what
it attempts to portray and describe. In this one, his hero discovers that
his wife is unfaithful to him. He leaves home, takes up with a wild
young girl, tries to bridge the gap between himself and his son and
eventually makes a life all over again with his returning wife. A fine
job and a memorable work of fiction.
J
acobs
, I
srael
.
Ten for kaddish. New York, Norton, 1972. 285 p.
The author is a rabbi and his novel is set in a small community with
a small Jewish population. The hero is, quite naturally, a rabbi, who
is in conflict with his
balabatim.
Finally, the rabbi and his board of
directors have an open battle. Meanwhile, the reader is offered an
inside look at Jewish community and synagogue life and politics.
J
acobson
, S
heldon
A. Fleet surgeon to Pharaoh. Portland, Oregon State
University Press, 1971. 317 p.
Set in 600 B.C.E., this is an adventure story of a Phoenician fleet
sailing around Africa, and a Hebrew doctor who serves the fleet. It is
interesting both for its nautical activities and philosophic and religious
insights into the ancient world.
K
emelman
, H
arry
.
Monday the rabbi took off. New York, Putnam, 1972.
316
p .
Rabbi David Small, the hero of Mr. Kemelman’s earlier popular de­
tective novels, is back at work. This time, the setting is Jerusalem and,
of course, the Arabs are the villains. As usual, there is a lot of
plot and a good deal of Jewish information is imparted, pleasantly and
painlessly.
L
evin
, M
eyer
.
The settlers. New York, Simon
8c
Schuster, 1972. 832
p.
A massive, ambitious, family-chronicle novel by one of our best, most
interesting and committed Jewish novelists. Mr. Levin follows the for­
tunes and misfortunes of a family that first settled in Palestine at the
turn of the century. He describes what happens throughout the decades
and covers the entire history of Zionism, on many levels, social as well
as personal.
L
ieber
, J
oel
.
Two-way traffic. New York, Doubleday, 1972. 324
p .
This is the fifth and final novel by a good Jewish novelist who com­
mitted suicide soon after completing this book. Written in a diary
format—so that it is hard to determine if this is truly fiction or auto­
biography— this is the story of a successful author named Jesse Jacobi
who has a shattered marriage and suicidal tendencies. It is a tragic novel
by a young man who still had much to offer the reader and a public
that had become attached to his work.
L
ink
, W
il l iam
,
and
L
evinson
, R
ichard
.
Fineman. New York, Laddin Press,
1972. 282 p.
The joint authors of this novel are highly successful TV writers. This
book is about a Jew who marries a Gentile and when he dies, the ques­
tion arises: was he Jewish? It is on this theme that the slick creators
of Mannix and Columbo write a solid and readable work of fiction.