Page 137 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 30

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R
i b a l o w
—A
m e r ic an
J
ew ish
F
ict ion
B
ooks
125
I,
ist
, S
helley
S
te inm an
.
Did you love daddy when I was born? New York,
Saturday Review Press, 1972. 150 p.
Another story of an upper middle-class Jewish housewife in the process
of getting a divorce and feeling the world press down upon her.
M
a lamud
, B
ernard
.
The tenants. New York, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1971.
2
B
0
p.
Vintage Malamud—meaning that the book is full of symbolism, parable
and alienation. This one is about the Jew-Negro confrontation. A Jewish
writer is in conflict wtih a Negro who wishes to become a writer. They
argue, discuss and fight over women and, in the end, destroy one another.
M
egoed
, A
haron
.
Living on the dead. Trans, from Hebrew
by M isha
Louvish.
New York, McCall, 1971. 249 p.
A disturbing novel by one of Israel’s finest fiction writers, about the
clay feet of a hero of Israel. Misguided idealism, sensuality and arro­
gance play large roles in this volume on contemporary life.
N
issenson
, H
ugh
.
In the reign of peace. New York, Farrar, Straus & Giroux,
1972. 158 p.
A collection of eight short stories by Mr. Nissenson, most dealing with
situations and people in various cities in Israel. A very fine tale is set
in the East Side sixty years ago.
Oz,
A
mos
.
My Michael. New
Y ork , K n op f , 1972. 304 p.
This novel has been a best-seller in Israel, and no wonder. Mr. Oz
deals not only with wars and uncertainties in Israel but with relation­
ships between men and women and between Jews and Arabs. Moral
questions are raised and one gains special insights into contemporary
Israel through the writings of one of its best writers.
P
otok
, C
h a im
.
My name
is
Asher Lev. New York, Knopf, 1972. 369 p.
Chaim Potok, who is rapidly becoming America’s most popular inter­
preter of Jewish life in this country, keeps to the same formula in his
third novel that has won him such a faithful following—with a twist
in plot. This time, his hero, also from a deeply pious family, turns to
painting. Thus, Mr. Potok remains in the same milieu, but also moves
into the world of art and a depiction of how one becomes an artist.
R
ichler
, M
ordecai
.
St Urbain’s horseman. New York, Knopf, 1971. 467 p.
Mr. Richler is a talented, many-faceted novelist, who has written
satire as well as solid fiction. In his most recent novel, he has produced
his finest work. His protagonist is a Canadian Jew (like himself) who
is a successful movie and TV director (again something like the author).
But his hero is deeply affected by the times, their tensions and crises.
R
ogin
, G
ilbert
.
What happens next? New York, Random, 1971. 260 p.
A series of short stories, offered as a unified novel, about Julian Singer,
an intellectual Jew, who has problems with his wife, his life and himself.
R
ubin
, M
ichael
.
An absence of bells. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1972. 198 p.
The story of an illicit romance between the wife of a Jewish psycholo­
gist and an Irish teacher. The psychologist, it turns out, is quite a tyrant
and his wife is therefore an unhappy woman.
S
hapiro
, E
ddie
.
Strange gods and the fighting rabbi. Norwich, N.
Y .,
Boun­
dary Press, 1972. 165 p.
An autobiography set in fictional form, this is the story of Rabbi
Edward Shapiro, who was raised on the lower East Side, became a prize
fighter and manager over the objections of his father, a rabbi. Eventu­
ally, he soured toward the ring and its corruption and turned to the
pulpit, where he served for many years in upstate New York.