Page 138 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 30

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126
J
e w i s h
B
o o k
A
n n u a l
S
hap iro
, K
arl
.
Edsel. New York, Bernard Geis, 1971. 308 p.
The hero of this vulgar and tasteless novel is Edsel Lazerow, a promi­
nent American-Jewish poet who tours Europe under the sponsorship of
the U.S. State Department. Mainly, his interest is women, women,
women. The author is a prominent American-Jewish poet.
S
hap iro
, L
amed
.
The Jewish government and other stories. Ed. and trans.
with an introduction by Curt Leviant. New York, Twayne, 1971. 187 p.
A
collection of
19
short stories about Russian-Jewish life in the
shtetl
by an undeservedly unknown Yiddish writer.
S
hubert
, H
ilda
.
They came from Kernitza. Montreal, Chateau Books, 1972.
A collection of three long stories about Russian Jews who come to
settle in Canada.
S
inger
, I
saac
B
ashevis
.
Enemies: a love story. New York, Farrar, Straus &
Giroux,
1972. 280
p.
This is Mr. Singer’s first novel set in the United States but it, like
all the others, deals wtih Europeans. A Polish Jew is saved by a Gentile
woman and, out of gratitude, marries her and brings her to New York. He
discovers that his first wife is still alive and the story starts to develop.
It is a thoughtful, meaningful novel, without the imps and devils that
have intrigued some, and upset other Singer readers. Previously pub­
lished serially in the
Forward,
this novel continues to strengthen Mr.
Singer’s reputation.
--------- . The Isaac Bashevis Singer reader. New York, Farrar, Straus & Giroux,
1971. 560 p.
A selection from the work of the famous Yiddish novelist, including
The Magician of Lublin,
a novel, sections of
In My Father’s Court,
and
many stories from his various collections.
S
tryjkowsk i
, J
ulian
.
The inn. Trans, from Polish by Selina Wieniewska.
New York, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972. 205 p.
The author, a noted Polish writer, has been awarded the Polish State
Prize for Literature. This book is the tale of what happens to a Jewish
town in Austria, during World War I, when the Cossacks come. There
is a description of a pogrom, of rape and pillage in a world now long
gone, but whose lessons are remembered by those who recall more
modern versions of pogroms.
W
einberg
, M
arcel
.
Spots of time. New York, Macmillan, 1972. 262 p.
Here is another Holocaust novel. Its hero is an orphan of the Hitler
war on humanity and the author describes the boy’s many adventures,
from refugee camp to safety in the United States.
W
eingarten
, V
iolet
.
A woman of feeling. New York, Knopf, 1972. 229 p.
Mrs. Jo Baer is a middle-class Jewish mother and, naturally (as in
most fiction, and perhaps real life, too) is in serious confrontation with
her son.
W
ouk
, H
erman
.
The winds of war. Boston, Little, Brown, 1971. 885 p.
A huge novel, the first of a series, about the years prior to World
War II. It includes dozens of historical characters and events (this
volume ends in 1941) and encompasses the rise of Hitler and the Nazis
and, simultaneously, the beginning of the destruction of the Jews of
Europe. A best-seller.