Page 11 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 31

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STEINBACH / INTRODUCTION
mind, the ebb and flow of Jewish thought and creativity. Indeed,
they are precious gems in the tiara of our spiritual and intellec-
tual dominion. Especially noteworthy, therefore, are the seven
bibliographies that constitute the granary that houses the literary
and cultural harvest gleaned in the past year: American Jewish
Non-Fiction Books; American Jewish Fiction Books; American
Jewish Juvenile Books; American Hebrew Books; Yiddish Books;
Anglo-Jewish Books; Selected Books of Israel. These establish a
barometer by which we may measure Jewish activity in the field
of letters. These books not only record the cultural temperature
of the Jewish people, but also chart the direction of Jewish
thought and ratiocination. They serve as a reaffirmation that ex-
panding the frontier of Jewish literature is an imperative de-
sideratum for Jewish survival.
In volume 31 of our
Annual
we have maintained the continuum
of subject matter with previous volumes. For example, Professor
Walter J. Fischel’s illuminating article on “The Literary Heritage
of the Kurdish Jews” is the fifth in a continuing series that began
with his article in volume 27 on “The Literary Heritage of the
Persian Speaking Jews.” In volume 28 he wrote on “The Literary
Creativity of the Jews of Cochin on the Malabar Coast”; in vol-
ume 29 on “The Literary Activities of the ‘Bene-Israel’ in India”;
in volume 30 on “The Literary Activities of the Arabic-Speaking
Jews in India.” Articles scheduled for volumes 32, 33, and 34,
respectively, are: “The Hebrew Writings of the Chinese Jews”;
“The Literary Creativity of the Bucharian Jews”; “The Literary
Activities of the Jews in Afghanistan.”
The same continuum has been followed with regard to Jewish
libraries. The article on “The Library of the Spertus College of
Judaica,” by Samuel M. Aksler, is the fourteenth in the series
which began with “Libraries in Israel” in volume 15. Subsequent
volumes dealt with the following: “On Community Libraries”;
“The Hebrew Union College Library”; “The Library of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of America”; “The Mendel Gottes-
man Library of Yeshiva University”; “The Jewish Division of the
New York Public Library”; “The Library of the Dropsie College”;
“The YIVO Library”; “The Judaica Collection at Harvard”;
“The Jewish Studies Collection at UCLA״ ; “Library of the
American Jewish Historical Society”; “Library and Archives of