Page 138 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 31

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
136
T
idym a n
, E
rnest
.
Shaft among the Jews.
New York, Dial Press, 1972.
244 p.
A black detective (made famous through the movies) takes on
a job for Hasidic diamond merchants and enters a strange, un-
familiar Jewish world.
T
rachtenberg
, I
nge
.
So slow the dawning.
New York, Norton, 1973.
249 p.
A novel set in Berlin in the 1930׳s and how the Westheimers,
living comfortably in Berlin, slowly became aware of the danger
and horror of Hitlerism and its meaning to them and all Jews.
U
h n a k
, D
orothy
.
Law and order.
New York, Simon
8c
Schuster, 1973.
499 p.
In this long, readable novel about the New York police force
and three generations of O'Malley cops, Mrs. Uhnak writes a
great deal about Jews on the force and the bigoted attitude of
the Irish against the Jews.
V
an
S
lyke
, H
elen
.
All visitors must be announced.
New York, Dou-
bleday, 1972. 372 p.
A papier-mach£ novel about a cooperative which fights against
accepting Jewish tenants. Mrs. Van Slyke manages to drag into
her story Nazis, vicious Jew-haters, genteel anti-Semites and noble
Christians.
W
e idm an
, J
erome
.
Last respects.
New York, Random House, 1972.
372 p.
A sequel to the story of Benny Kramer, first introduced in
Fourth Street East.
Here we read about Benny, his mother as
bootlegger and the usual East Side poverty.
Y
oseloff
, M
art in
.
Remember me to Marcie.
South Brunswick, N.J.,
A. S. Barnes, 1973.
The author himself comes from Iowa and so does his heroine,
who comes to New York, experiences some love affairs and finally
settles down to marriage with the editor of a Zionist magazine.
Y
oung
,
I. S.
Uncle Herschel, Dr. Padilsky and the evil eye.
New York,
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973. 264 p.
A nostalgic, good-humored, familiar story of immigrant Jews
at the turn of the century finding their way in New York tene-
ment life.