Page 53 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 31

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47
STARKMAN / YIDDISH PRESS AND LITERATURE
in literature while still living abroad. At the beginning of World
War I New York outdistanced most, if not all, of the Yiddish
literary centers in Eastern Europe.
A number of the younger generation of Yiddish writers be-
came professional journalists, while others contributed to the
Yiddish press their works in the fields of the novel and the short
story. Rare were the cases of prose writers who were simulta-
neously also contributors of poetry to the Yiddish press. Fa-
mous among such exceptions was Abraham Reisen. While every
Yiddish daily enhanced the development of Yiddish literature in
America, of longer and lasting value have been the roles played
by
Yiddishes Tageblatt, Forverts, Varheit, Der Morgen Zhurnal,
Der Tog
and
Morgen Freiheit.
It would take us too far afield to
evaluate the various general Yiddish weeklies and the official or-
gans of Jewish parties and trade unions as regards their specific
contributions to the development of Yiddish literature in Amer-
ica.
The New York Yiddish dailies published in serial form the
novels and short stories of Sholem Aleichem and Mordecai
Spektor, both of whom belong to the classical era in modern
Yiddish literature; also the works of such distinguished prose
writers as Sholem Asch, Peretz Hirschbein, Leon Kobrin, Z. Libin,
Joseph Opatoshu, M. Osherowitz, David Pinski, Isaac Raboy,
Abraham Reisen, Zalman Schneur, I. J. Singer, Tolush and I. J.
Trunk. Their works were read in the newspapers long before
they became available in bookform. The entire new Yiddish
translation of the Bible by the poet Yehoash was first published
serially for newspaper readers. Novels of Isaac Bashevis Singer
and Chaim Grade are still printed serially in the
Forverts
before their being issued in bookform, whether in the Yiddish
original or in English translation. Among the poets whose verses
illuminated the pages of Yiddish newspapers during various
decades, mention should be made of Moshe Leib Halpern, H.
Leivick, A. Lutzky, Abraham Lyessin, Mani Leib, Abraham
Reisen and Morris Rosenfeld. To the ranks of many Yiddish
poets whose journalistic abilities enriched the Yiddish press,
such gifted men belonged as B. J. Bialostotzky, M. Boraisha, D.
Einhorn, L. Feinberg, A. Glanz-Leyeles, Jacob Glatstein, Naf-
tali Gross, R. Iceland, J. Kissin, Mark Schweid, E. Auerbach,
J. Slonim and Nahum Yud, to mention only a few.