Page 43 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 32

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DENOLA / T H E JEW IS H STUDENT PRESS
35
basis. Because most of the papers are handouts, high quality
notwithstanding, there is very little opportunity for the papers
to raise money and go independent.
ED ITO R IA L INDEPENDENCE M A IN TA IN ED
Despite the dictum that “a newspaper is only independent
when it is financially independent,” a major characteristic of
the movement papers is tha t they are completely outspoken
and willing to risk losing their funding, if need be, in order to
remain independent. T he serious editors and writers, although
in general not accomplished journalists, aim at journalistic
excellence by operating on the assumption tha t “the tru th is
the most important ingredient in a free press.”
So far, the policy of bringing issues of Jewish significance
out in the open and discussing them in open journals seems
to have paid off. T he Jewish movement press has grown, not
withered. Journals tha t have attempted to be viable additions
to established Jewish journalism have flourished.
Response
magazine’s special anthology,
The Jewish Woman,
has sold
thousands of copies and offers have been made to produce it
in book form.
Response's
latest issue on the Yom Kippur War
promises to be even more popular, as major Jewish organiza­
tions are buying copies in the hundreds. The new Jewish press
may be taking on new importance in its attempt to affect
Jewish public opinion.
As mentioned earlier, a communications network evolved
out of the first editors’ conference in 1969. T he final product
of tha t mandate officially became, in 1970, the Jewish Student
Press Service, which is a full-fledged distributing house and
feature service for virtually all the Jewish student publications
in North America, and for some twenty other publications
abroad.
The Press Service sends out biweekly mailings which contain
copies of all papers published in tha t two week period. T he
packets also contain various articles, interviews, graphics and
photographs on all aspects of Israel and the Middle East, the
American Jewish community, the Jewish student community,
and the Jewish community at large. T he material is gathered
by the main office in New York and from a full-time Israel
bureau based in Jerusalem.