Page 85 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 32

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WIENER / JEWISH LITERARY ANNIVERSARIES
77
Palestine in 1930 and joined Kibbutz Gevat. She published several
volumes of Hebrew poetry, also stories and plays for children.
S
ir
I
srael
B
rodie
80th birthday. Born in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England,
April 4, 1895. From 1948-1965, he served as chief rabbi of the
British Commonwealth, the first one to be knighted. He edited the
medieval Jewish law code of Jacob ben Judah Hazzan of London.
G
edaliah
B
ublick
100th anniversary of birth. Born in Grodno, Rus­
sia, October 10, 1875, died in New York in 1948. In New York
since 1904 after spending some time in Argentina, he was a Yiddish
journalist, eventually on the editorial board of the
Jewish Morning
Journal.
Politically he was active in the Mizrachi movement and
also served on the executive of the Jewish Agency.
H
a y im
I
saac
B
unin
100th anniversary of birth. Born in Gomel, Rus­
sia, January 12, 1875, perished in Treblinka in 1943. An itinerant
teacher, he devoted himself to research in the Habad movement of
Hasidism, publishing a series of articles about this movement in
Judaism in the Hebrew magazine
Hashiloah.
He also compiled
an anthology of the sayings of the Habad leaders.
E
l iak im
C
armo ly
100th anniversary of death. Born in Sulz, Alsace,
in 1802, died in Frankfort on the Main, Germany, February 15,
1875. After having served as rabbi in Brussels, he eventually
settled in Frankfort, where he was engaged in scholarly pursuits.
His scholarship was attacked for his alleged carelessness and even
forgery. Among his works were studies on Jewish medicine and
Jewish physicians and monographs on the history of the Jews in
various countries published in the
Revue Orientale,
edited by him
in 1841-46.
J
oseph
C
aro
400th anniversary of death. Born apparently in Toledo,
Spain, in 1488, died in Safed, Palestine, March 24, 1575. Although
best remembered as the author of the
Shulhan Aruch,
which has
become the authoritative code of practice for traditional Jews, he
himself did not consider it as important as some of his other works.
Actually it was only an abridgment of his much larger
Bet Yosef,
an exhaustive commentary on the
Arba’ah Turim
of Jacob ben
Asher, written 200 years earlier. In this major work he endeavored
to arrive at a definitive position of all Jewish laws, considering
Alfasi, Maimonides, and Asher ben Jehiel as well. Another book
was
Kesef Mishneh,
a commentary to part of Maimonides*
Mishneh Torah,
tracing its sources, thus becoming part of every
standard edition of the latter work. An entirely different type of
book is the
Magid Mesharim,
part of a diary of the mystic revela­
tions that came to him at night. In his lifetime, he already received
great acclaim. His Yeshivah in Safed, where he had moved in 1536
after having lived in Turkey for over 30 years, was world-renowned.