Page 88 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 32

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
of his manuscripts listing 411 items. He also was a moving spirit
in the establishment of the Mekize Nirdamim Society in 1864,
which set as its task to publish rare Hebrew works and continues
its existence in Israel to this day.
H
e br ew
U
nion
C
ollege
100th anniversary of founding. Established
in Cincinnati, Ohio, in October 1875, it is the oldest American
rabbinical seminary now in existence. Founded by Isaac M. Wise,
the prominent Reform rabbi of his generation, it has been sup­
ported by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, which
had been established two years previously, one of its main pur­
poses being the setting up of a training institution for rabbis.
Although Wise originally hoped to prepare rabbis for all types
of American congregations regardless of their religious outlook,
the College became eventually the school for Reform rabbis
primarily, as other seminaries began to fill the needs of the more
traditional congregations. Nevertheless, as a pioneering effort
it set a pattern and served as an example to the other seminaries
in many ways. Its faculty attracted outstanding Jewish scholars
from abroad in its earlier period, and more recently, it has
trained its own scholars.
M
oses
H
ess
100th anniversary of death. Born in Bonn, Germany,
in 1812, died in Paris, April 5, 1875. One of the early Socialists,
who eventually broke with Karl Marx, he is best remembered as
the author of
Rom und Jerusalem
(1862), in which he advocated
the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine, just as the Italian
state was being restored at that time. Although this book had little
impact at the time it was published, it came into its own when
the Zionist movement under Herzl captured the imagination of
large sections of Jewry.
M
endel
H
irsch
75th anniversary of death. Born in Oldenburg, Ger­
many, in 1833, died in Frankfurt on the Main, March 28, 1900.
Eldest son of Samson Raphael Hirsch, the founder of modern
Orthodoxy, he was the headmaster of the Jewish day schools
founded by his father in Frankfurt. In addition to articles on
Jewish education, he wrote commentaries in German on parts of
the Bible, the one on the Haftarot also being translated into
English. Another work in English translation was
Humanism
and Judaism
(1928).
S
am u e l
I
sban
70th birthday. Born in Gostinin, Poland, September
26, 1905. Settling with his family in Palestine as a boy, he came
to America in 1938. He has been writing novels in Yiddish about
life in Palestine, on biblical themes, and about an American
Jewish family. Several of these have been translated into Hebrew.