Page 56 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 33

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46
JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
Zion and Israel as well as the meaning of the Holocaust provide
an added dimension.
Translations are fresh and exciting. For example, the
Ve'ahavta
is rendered:
“You shall love the Lord your God
With all your mind,
With all your strength,
With all your being . . .
Regular worshippers at services will be obliged to learn a
whole new rhythm of readings and responsive cadences.
Sections of the services are now identified by the traditional
Hebrew name and by content. The Shabbat
Amidah
introduces
each paragraph with its appropriate heading; e.g.
Avot:
God of
all generations;
Gevurot:
God’s Power;
Kedushat ha-Shem:
God’s
Holiness;
Kedushat ha-Yom:
The holiness of Shabbat, etc
The
Hatzi-Kaddish
has been restored to the CCAR
Siddur,
although in the first service for Erev Shabbat i t is still missing
in the transition from the
Ve-shamru
to the
Amidah,
where it
properly belongs. The
Ve-shamru,
incidentally, has been re­
stored in its entirety. Heretofore, the selection ended
Ot he
le-olam.
Apparently, the editor had no theological qualms about
ki sheshet yamim asah Adonai.
. . . Yet, there is still some hesi­
tation in the
Gevurot
prayer regarding immortality, so God is
Mehaye ha-Kol,
“all life is Your gift.” Curiously, in the Yom
ha-Atzmaut service, the
mehaye ha-metim
is included.
One would assume that a reader would confine himself (her­
self) to one service at a given Sabbath, although an eclectic selec­
tion might appeal to some congregations. Since the average at­
tendant at religious services may be unfamiliar with the structure
and thematic content of the liturgy, the new
Siddur
should
provide an opportunity for prayer and for education.
There are some printing errors in the “Final Draft of Part I ”
which, hopefully, will be corrected in the printed edition.
It remains to be seen whether or not this new
Siddur,
or the
new
Mahzor,
will change the prayer habits of American Jews,
since both have the unique distinction of directing the movement
of Conservative and Reform Judaism into the mainstream of
Jewish life. For the nostalgic there are songs and prayers that
are suggestive of the tradition. For those seeking a new meaning