Page 82 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 33

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HAROLD U. RIBALOW
Selected Books of
American Jewish Fiction*
A n g o f f , C h a r l e s .
Journey to the Dawn .
New York: Beechhurst, 1951.
421 pp.
---- .
M id-Century.
Cranbury, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, 1973. 349 pp. $7.95.
Journey to the Dawn
was the first and
M id-Cen tury
is the
latest of Angoff’s novels on the Polonsky family, a huge and suc­
cessful evocation of Jewish life in America as seen through fiction.
The other titles, in progression, are:
In the M orn ing L igh t, T he
Sun at N o on , Be tween Day and Dark, T he B i t te r Spring, Summer
Storm , Memory of Au tumn , W in ter Tw i l igh t
and
Season of Mists.
---- .
When I Was a Boy in Boston.
Plainview, N.Y.: Books for Libra­
ries, 1947. 171 pp. $7.75. Reprint.
A collection—Angoff’s first—of Jewish short stories, character
portrayals and sketches of people who later appear in the Polonsky
saga.
---- .
Someth ing A bou t M y Father.
Cranbury, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, 1956.
366 p p . $4.50.
A volume of thirty-five stories about American Jews, some of
whom reappear in Angoff’s novels and some of whom never do.
A n g o f f , C h a r l e s ,
and
L ev in , M ey e r .
T he R ise of American Jewish
L itera tu re .
New York: Simon and Schuster, 1970. 988 pp. $15.00.
A large collection of segments of popular and important Ameri­
can Jewish novels, selected by the two editors, with introductory
commentaries and judgments. Books included are:
T he R ise of
D av id Levinsky
by Abraham Cahan,
Journey to the Dawn
by
Charles Angoff,
Call I t Sleep
by Henry Roth,
T he Island W ith in
* This is a highly selective list of books. To begin, with every volume
is in print, either in a trade edition or a paperback. Each title is a
book about American-Jewish life, which makes it necessary to omit
major authors and volumes on Jewish themes, people and problems
elsewhere in the world. Many exceptional Jewish works of fiction, not
listed here because of their general unavailability, can, of course, be
found on many library shelves. This list, however, is a substantial
commencement to those who wish to savor contemporary American-
Jewish writing readily at hand.
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