Page 88 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 33

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
307 pp. $6.95. New York: New American Library, 1974. $1.50.
A sensitive account of the maturing of a young Jewish woman
who tries to shake off the possessive influence of her family.
S in g er , I sa a c B a sh ev is .
A Crown of Feathers.
New York: Farrar, Straus
and Giroux, 1974. 364 pp. $8.95. New York: Fawcett, 1974. $1.50.
In this collection of short stories, the noted Yiddish writer
sets many of his unique, imaginative tales in New York City and
other areas of America. He concentrates on New York’s West
Side, where he finds Jews transplanted from Europe who have
odd and intriguing problems.
---- .
Enemies: A Love Story.
New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux,
1972. 280 pp. $6.95. New York: Fawcett, 1973. $1.25.
This is the first Singer novel set in America. It is both sad and
humorous as it tells the story of a Jew who has survived the
Holocaust and is involved with three different women in America,
all connected with his past and his present complicated life.
W a ld e n , D a n i e l .
On Be ing Jewish.
New York: Fawcett, 1974. 480 pp.
$1.75.
An interesting anthology of American-Jewish writing, which
includes poetry, short stories and excerpts from novels. Repre­
sented here are Abraham Cahan, Bruno Lessing, Alter Brody,
Anzia Yezierska, Ludwig Lewisohn, Myron Brinig, Henry Roth,
Ben Hecht, Edward Lewis Wallant, Jo Sinclair, Laura Z. Hobson,
Arthur Miller, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, Her­
bert Gold and David Evanier.
W a l l a n t , Edw ard L ew is .
T he Human Season.
New York: Harcourt
Brace Jovanovich, 1960. 192 pp. $3.75. New York. Harbrace, 1973.
$1.65.
A beautifully-controlled work of fiction about a middle-aged
Jew attempting to live with the realization that his beloved wife
is dead.
---- .
T he Pawnbroker.
New York: Harcourt Brace and World, 1961.
279 pp. $4.50. New York: Manor Books. $1.25.
A quietly-dramatic tale of a Jewish pawnbroker, a broken sur­
vivor of the Holocaust, whose wife did not survive. He tries, un­
successfully, to create a new emotional life for himself in New
York, where he runs a pawnshop in a poor New York neighbor­
hood.
W e idm an , J e rom e .
Fourth S treet East.
New York: Random House,
1970. 239 pp. $5.95. New York: Pinnacle, 1971. $1.75.
This is the first in a series of three novels about Benny Kramer
of the East Side. It is an affectionate remembrance of a life long
gone and Weidman has continued the life and adventures of