Page 103 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 34

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NASH / AHAD HA'AM: WORDSMITH AND MORAL FORCE
93
Surely, one mark of a classic is that it addresses so many lev­
els of esthetic and intellectual appreciation. Ahad Ha'am is god­
father to all political moderates, to dovish Israeli university pro­
fessors, to rabbis wishing to invoke the congenital antagonism
between “king” and “prophet,” to utopian visionaries scornful
of flawed realities, to the American Reconstructionism of Mor-
decai Kaplan, to many Orthodox believers who would find it
remarkable or irrelevant to learn that he did not “believe,”
and in this Bicentennial year, to discussions of Jewish identity
and ethics in America. On this fiftieth anniversary of his death,
Ahad Ha'am’s unique mix of style, erudition, conviction and
integrity appears assured of immortality, if only because of his
variegated and periodically regenerating readership.
FOR FURTHER READING
Ahad Ha'am,
Writings
(Hebrew). Tel-Aviv: Dvir, 1961.
Ahad Ha'am.
Selected Essays.
Ed. L. Simon. New York: Athe-
neum, 1970.
Ahad Ha'am.
Nationalism and the Jewish Ethic.
Ed. H. Kohn.
New York: Schocken, 1962.
Cohen, I., and B. Michali, eds.
An Anthology of Hebrew Essays.
2
vols. Tel Aviv: Masada, 1966.
Hertzberg, A., ed.
The Zionist Idea.
Garden City: Doubleday
and Herzl Press, 1959.
Simon, L.
Ahad Ha‘am: A Biography.
Philadelphia: Jewish Pub­
lication Society, 1960.