Page 224 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 34

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
received a citation for excellence from the Colonial Philadelphia
Historical Society.
Haym Salomon: Liberty’s Son,
well written and charmingly
illustrated by Richard Fish, tells the dramatic story o f the
Polish-born Jew who cast his lot with the American rebels. A
citation on the back of a Bicentennial stamp recently issued by
United States Postal Service in the series commemorating “Con­
tributors to the Cause” reads: “ Businessman and broker, Haym
Salomon was responsible for raising most of the money needed
to finance the American revolution and later to save the new
nation from collapse.”
W ILL IAM AND JANICE EPSTEIN AW A R D
The fiction award is presented in the name of William and Janice
Epstein. Mr. Epstein is a member of the Executive Board o f the
Jewish Book Council and president of Bookazine, one of the
largest book wholesalers in the country, and publisher of
Judaica
Book News,
an excellent source for information on current
Judaica.
The judges for the fiction award were Maier Deshell, editor
of the Jewish Publication Society of America, Dr. Alfred Kazin,
distinguished professor of English at Hunter College, and Dr.
Irving Malin, professor of English at City College.
The judges selected for this award Johanna Kaplan for her
collection of short stories entitled
Other People’s Lives
(Alfred
A. Knopf). Johanna Kaplan was born in New York City where
she attended public schools and graduated from New York
University. Her short stories and reviews have appeared in
Commentary
and
Harper's Magazine,
and she has received grants
for her writing from the New York State Council on the Arts
and from the National Endowment for the Arts. Johanna Kaplan
lives in New York City and is a teacher of emotionally disturbed
children.
Other People’s Lives
is her first book to be published, and was
a nominee for the National Book Award. One reviewer o f
Other
People’s Lives
wrote: “ Kaplan’s milieu is New York City, and
her prose bristles with the spirited and sharp perceptions o f
Jewish city living. She concentrates primarily on creating charac­
ters, on the sparkle and zesty detail of their monologues. Her