Page 51 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 34

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LANDIS/ YIDDISH THEATRE
41
attentiveness, and almost daily bulletins is Yiddish.”15 The
crucial question is, in the last analysis, not how long will the
poor thing hang on but rather the extent to which the creativity
and sense of self of one cultural era can fructify and enrich the
consciousness of its successor. The mood of America during this
period of the post-assimilationist generation has been to retain
ethnic identities. For Jews, the Yiddish theater has always been
a major force in bolstering this need. It seems eager to do so still.
15
Jacob Glatstedn, “Our Chosen Language,”
Yiddish
I (Fall 1973) 1.