Page 13 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 35

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KABAKOFF / INTRODUCTION
3
III
In his oft-quoted Testament to his son, Judah ibn T ibbon
offered the following practical advice:
Arrange your books in good order so that you do not
have to weary yourself in searching for the book you need
. . . Make a list of the books of each field and keep the
lists with the books.
In the spirit of this advice the Annua l continues to provide
bibliographic guidance which enhances its usefulness as a refer­
ence tool. In addition to the eight annual bibliographies cover­
ing the literary output in America, England and Israel, a num­
ber of valuable survey articles have also been provided.
The literature on Sephardic Jew ry is reviewed by Rabbi Marc
D. Angel, who provides a guide to the available English works
in this growing field. How Jewish writers perceive the impact
and influence of the new women’s movement on Judaism is
considered by Blu Greenberg in her survey of the spate of
books that have appeared in this area.
For the past quarter of a century the Jewish Book Council has
highlighted the importance of Jewish juven ile literature by
making an annual award to an author of an outstanding juven ile
work. A retrospective view of Jewish juven ile literature and an
evaluation of the awards are provided by Marcia Posner, who is
not always in agreement with some of the decisions made by the
judges.
How to cope w ith the proliferation of printed Hebraic and
Judaica materials is considered by Dr. Leonard Gold in his com­
prehensive survey of library catalogs. He has included libraries
of various types and has brought within his purview overseas
collections that are of primary importance in the search for
information and titles. In our continuing survey of Jewish
libraries and the Jewish holdings of general libraries, Dr. Edward
A. Ja jko has described the Judaica collections at Yale Univer­
sity. Rose S. Klein has utilized the resources of one specialized
library, that of the American Antiquarian Society, to deter­
mine how Jews and Judaism were treated in early American
fictional works.
The annual survey of Jewish literary anniversaries by Rabbi