Page 200 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 35

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190
JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
N
eugeboren
, J
a y
.
An orphan ’s tale.
New York, Holt, Rinehart &
Winston, 1976. 268 p.
A bright but confused 12-year old orphan runs away from an
orphanage upon hearing of its imminent closing, in order to find
an alumnus to act as benefactor. In diary form, it offers insights
into the human condition and the meaning of Jewish identity.
N
eugro schel
, J
o a ch im
,
ed.
Yenne velt: the grea t works of Jewish
fantasy and occult.
New York, Stonehill, 1976. 2 vols. 353, 357 p.
A compilation of stories which blend mysticism with reality,
together with an informative introduction.
S
chulz
, B
r u n o
.
The s tree t of crocodiles.
Tr.
b y
Celina Wieniewska.
New York, Penguin, 1977. 160 p.
Thirteen extraordinary stories set in the Galician town of Dro-
gobych by a gifted Polish writer who was killed by the gestapo.
The author’s father, an invalid, is a main figure in stories that
combine surrealism, a sense of the grotesque, fantasy and a vivid
visual imagination.
S
e ym o u r
, G
erald
.
The glory boys.
New York, Random House, 1976.
An IRA gunman and a PLO terrorist join together to try to
assassinate an Israeli atomic scientist. The characters are credibly
drawn.
S
ilm a n
, R
oberta
.
B lood relations.
Boston, Little, Brown, 1977.
Sixteen short stories by a talented young Jewish writer and an
engaging storyteller, about mothers, isolated women and men,
grandparents and children.
S
p ic eh an d ler
, E
zra
and
A
rn son
, C
ur t is
.
N ew w r iting in Israel.
New
York, Schocken, 1977. 255 p.
A selection of stories by 5 Israeli authors, including Nobel Prize
winning novelist S. Y. Agnon and Aharon Appelfeld. Also pre­
sented is a sampling of the work of 13 poets.
U
h lm a n
, F
red
.
R eun ion .
New York, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1977.
112 p.
A sentimental, romanticized novella about the friendship be­
tween two 16-year old boys as the Nazis consolidate their rule of
Germany. One boy, the narrator, is Jewish; the other is a Ger­
man count who befriends him for a while and then breaks off
relations because of his admiration for Hitler.
U
j v a r i
, P
e ter
.
By candleligh t.
Tr. by Andrew Handler. New Jersey,
Fairleigh Dickinson, 1977, 252 p.
This 1908 novel by a talented Hungarian Jewish writer (often
called "the Hungarian Sholom Aleichem”) deals with Gedaliah
Livniczer, a serious rabbinical student who is drawn to the secu­
lar philosophy of the German Enlightenment, and breaks loose