Page 52 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 35

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
as “Bible, Prieres juives,” correspond to equ ivalent concepts
fam iliar to the American user. Volumes commemorating Jewish
communities destroyed during W o rld W a r II are a ll entered
under the heading “Yizkor,” followed by a place name.
B. Larger catalogs
These catalogs, because of the breadth of their scope, are,
perhaps the major productions of the period under review.
Since they are reproductions of long-established card catalogs,
they represent the cataloging work of many decades and, in ­
evitably, contain some inconsistencies.
1. United States. Library of Congress. Hebraic section. He­
braic title catalog. Washington, D.C., L ibrary of Congress
photoduplication service, 1968.
2. New York public library. Dictionary catalog of the Jewish
collection. Boston, G. K. Hall 8c Co., 1960. 14 v. First
supplement. Boston, G. K. Hall 8c Co., 1975. 8 v.
3. Hebrew union college—Jewish institute of religion. Dic­
tionary catalog of the K lau library, Cincinnati. Boston,
G.K. Hall 8c Co., 1964. 32 v.
4. Harvard university. Library. Catalogue of Hebrew books.
Cambridge, Mass., Harvard university library, 1968. 6 v.
Supplement I. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard university lib­
rary, 1972. 3 v.
The L ibrary of Congress catalog is different from the others
in that it was offered for sale on microfilm (16 reels of 35mm.
microfilm) or on ledger stock, permalife o r rag stock. As offered,
therefore, it is potentially a book catalog. Some 39,000 works
are listed by title in Hebrew alphabetic order in two sequences,
one for Hebrew and one for Yiddish. Judaica in the Roman al­
phabet is not included. Approximately two-thirds of the entries
represent all of the Library of Congress printed cards available
at the time of publication. The remaining cards were assembled
from collections throughout the United States. The Jewish Di­
vision of The New York Public Library, with which the present
writer is directly involved, acquired the Hebraic title catalog
on rolls of permalife paper. These were cut and bound into 25